YOU'RE MUCH CLOSER TO SOURCES OF INDOOR POLLUTION, EPA WARNS With simple steps to avoid hidden and common exposures By MAX GATES., pub. Seattle Times, Oct 2, 1989. pg. C.8 Note: Some reference material added after the article. For a "Deeper Dive" on isolating and avoiding COMMON Toxic Exposures {though they are often hidden and or censored| I highly recommend The Environmental Working Group https://www.ewg.org/ Example from the article; "Chloroform, also an animal carcinogen, is released from water during hot showers and clothes- and dish-washing. ``Half the chloroform comes out before the water hits the tub, and 10 minutes in the shower can expose the rest of the family to chloroform for up to two hours,'' he said, recommending that bathrooms be properly vented to reduce exposure." End of quote from the article. PLEASE NOTE THE "FAIR USE STATEMENT" AFTER THE #CENSORED & COPYRIGHTED ARTICLE: Abstract (Article Summary) While major pollution-control efforts have focused on industry and automobiles, three-quarters of the typical American's exposure to toxic chemicals occurs indoors, according to a federal Environmental Protection Agency scientist. And because much of the indoor exposure results from everyday tasks, done at home and ``close to your nose,'' Americans can take some simple steps to minimize their exposure to potentially harmful chemicals, says Lance Wallace, who has been sampling indoor pollution in homes across the country for the past decade. ``We've found that consumer products and personal activities are the major sources of exposure,'' Wallace told a recent meeting of the American Lung Association in Annapolis. ``The traditional (toxic) sites that EPA has worried about were not very important in exposure.'' Full Text (763 words) Copyright Seattle Times Oct 2, 1989 ANNAPOLIS, Md. - The foam pillow you sleep on could be hazardous to your health. So could a freshly dry-cleaned suit, a morning shower and the air freshener that scents the room. While major pollution-control efforts have focused on industry and automobiles, three-quarters of the typical American's exposure to toxic chemicals occurs indoors, according to a federal Environmental Protection Agency scientist. And because much of the indoor exposure results from everyday tasks, done at home and ``close to your nose,'' Americans can take some simple steps to minimize their exposure to potentially harmful chemicals, says Lance Wallace, who has been sampling indoor pollution in homes across the country for the past decade. ``We've found that consumer products and personal activities are the major sources of exposure,'' Wallace told a recent meeting of the American Lung Association in Annapolis. ``The traditional (toxic) sites that EPA has worried about were not very important in exposure.'' Wallace doesn't argue that efforts to clean up outdoor air are pointless. Air pollutants such as ozone, sulfur dioxide and nitrogen oxides can damage the environment and pose a direct threat to the health of people with lung diseases such as asthma and emphysema. But, while most of the toxic emissions occur outdoors, most of the actual exposure of Americans to toxic chemicals occurs inside, he said. ``The average American spends only 4 percent of his time outdoors,'' Wallace said. ``We don't spend much time on the tops of buildings or in intersections where pollution measurements are taken.'' Wallace and his EPA colleagues found, for example, that while automobiles produce 82 percent of toxic emissions, they result in just 18 percent of humans' exposure to toxic chemicals. Industry produces 14 percent of emissions, but just 3 percent of exposures. On the other hand, cigarettes account for 0.1 percent of toxic emissions in the country but produce 39 percent of humans' exposure to toxic chemicals. The exposure to toxic chemicals from smoking by others exceeds that from industrial pollutants, Wallace said. Wallace began his studies 10 years ago in two areas of the country with the worst reputations for air pollution - Los Angeles and northern New Jersey. The EPA team sampled air inside and outside homes, then tested the breath of residents to determine what chemicals they had been exposed to. ``All 11 chemicals that we looked at were at much higher exposures - two to five times higher - in homes as outdoors,'' he said. ``And remember, this was outdoors in New Jersey.'' The work since has been expanded to more than a dozen cities across the country. ``In every city, in every season, the indoor exposures are greater than outdoor sources,'' Wallace said. ``This explains why no one ever steps inside for a breath of fresh air,'' he said. Among the chemicals of concern were: -- Benzene, known to cause leukemia in humans, was traced to cigarette smoking, automobile travel, pumping gas and vapors from attached garages. ``Smokers had a good deal more of everything in their breath,'' Wallace said. -- Para-dichlorobenzene, linked to cancer in animals, is present in air fresheners, moth crystals and restroom disinfectants. High levels can persist for years in some homes. -- Chloroform, also an animal carcinogen, is released from water during hot showers and clothes- and dish-washing. ``Half the chloroform comes out before the water hits the tub, and 10 minutes in the shower can expose the rest of the family to chloroform for up to two hours,'' he said, recommending that bathrooms be properly vented to reduce exposure. -- Tetrachloroethylene, another animal carcinogen, is now the chemical of choice for dry cleaning, replacing the now-banned carbon tetrachloride. Newly dry-cleaned clothes can emit tetrachloroethylene for seven to 10 days. ``In our tests, 37 people who had gone to the dry cleaners had twice the amount of tetracholoroethlylene in their breath,'' Wallace said. Hanging dry-cleaned clothes outside for a day ``will save 20-30 percent of the exposure,'' he said. Many sources of indoor pollution can be removed or controlled, and there are other steps homeowners can take to reduce exposure. NASA scientists said this week that several varieties of common house plants remove common pollutants from the air: Philodendrons, spider plants and golden pothos take out formaldehyde; flowering plants such as gerbera daisies and chrysanthemums remove benzene; bamboo palms, peace lilies, ficus, mass cane, mother-in-law's tongue, English ivy and Chinese evergreen also can help with indoor pollution. Wallace said equipment such as electrostatic precipitators and negative ion generators are helpful in removing some pollutants, but tend to be expensive and only partially effective. FAIR USE NOTICE: This site contains copyrighted material the use of which has not always been specifically authorized by the copyright owner. We are making such material available in our efforts to advance understanding of environmental, political, human rights, economic, democracy, scientific, and social justice issues, etc. We believe this constitutes a 'fair use' of any such copyrighted material as provided for in section 107 of the U.S. Copyright Law. In accordance with Title 17 U.S.C. Section 107, the material on this site is distributed without profit to those who have expressed a prior interest in receiving the included information for research and educational purposes. >>> >>> >>> >>> >>> >>> >>> >>> >>> Using Plants To Filter Indoor Air One of the embedded links in the cited story is "NASA conducted a study " It gives the PDF copy of "INTERIOR LANDSCAPE PLANTS FOR INDOOR AIR POLLUTION ABATEMENT" In Reference: PDF copy of some NASA Research {for space travel}> "INTERIOR LANDSCAPE PLANTS FOR INDOOR AIR POLLUTION ABATEMENT" https://ntrs.nasa.gov/archive/nasa/casi.ntrs.nasa.gov/19930073077.pdf Archive WaybackMachine Copy: https://web.archive.org/web/20200214080757/https://ntrs.nasa.gov/archive/nasa/casi.ntrs.nasa.gov/19930073077.pdf >>> >>> >>> How to Avoid VOCs in New Bedding By Amy Highland, RTK Environmental Group, https://rtkenvironmental.com/indoor-air-quality-radon/how-to-avoid-vocs-in-new-bedding/

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