Comments on the "Rocket Docket" of Victim Disarmament Legislation https://wp.me/pnsSi-242 / https://wp.me/p12LUf-ew

More from mikewb1971

Add to this the fact that corporate welfare (tax-funded movies and TV shows, sports stadiums, agricultural subsidies, etc., etc., etc.) enables corporations and the fatcats running them (the alleged betes noir of fascists calling themselves "the Left") to keep their prices high (pricing their products and services out of the reach of poor people), stifles innovation, engenders cronyist corruption, and works to limit market selection. https://facebook.com/arvin.vohra.9/posts/2221171761247638 Wednesday, December 19, 2018 at 6:00 PM Ending welfare isn't about denying things to the poor. It's about making things so affordable that anyone can afford them easily. Take, for example, government schools. Education at that level should cost a tiny fraction of the 10k a year per student that those schools get in tax dollars. Anyone should be able to afford it. But thanks to welfare, the costs are inflated. Instead of poor people paying a low cost, taxpayers pay a high cost. Healthcare is the same. If there was no medicaid, then poor people would only be able to afford low fees. Doctors and drug companies would have a huge incentive to lower costs. Poor people would end up paying low costs, instead of what we have today, which is tax payers paying high costs. Areas without welfare see low costs. While the costs of old medical technology rises, as shown with the price increases in Epipen, the cost of computer technology continually drops. That's not because medicines are largely chemical, and computers are largely electronic. It's because one gets welfare and the other doesn't. Poor people serve a vital role in any economy. Because they are usually the most price sensitive, they put constant downward pressure on prices. Because poor people can only afford say, $40 for a computer, there are computers that cost $40. If it wasn't for them, there would be no reason to sell cheap computers - or cheap food, clothes, or entertainment. Poor people lower the costs for all of us. Because every penny matters to them, companies have incentives to find ways to lower prices by a cent or two. Over time, this adds up, and prices fall in ways that benefit us all. Welfare takes away that downward pressure. That's why in areas where you have welfare - healthcare, public schools, college financial aid, prices are sky high. In areas without welfare - computers, etc. - prices keep falling. Ending welfare helps everyone. If elected, I will end welfare. Respectfully, Arvin Vohra https://facebook.com/VohraEducation/ Candidate for President Author of Pull Out: Men, Modern Life, and Mutiny
12 views ·

More from mikewb1971

Add to this the fact that corporate welfare (tax-funded movies and TV shows, sports stadiums, agricultural subsidies, etc., etc., etc.) enables corporations and the fatcats running them (the alleged betes noir of fascists calling themselves "the Left") to keep their prices high (pricing their products and services out of the reach of poor people), stifles innovation, engenders cronyist corruption, and works to limit market selection. https://facebook.com/arvin.vohra.9/posts/2221171761247638 Wednesday, December 19, 2018 at 6:00 PM Ending welfare isn't about denying things to the poor. It's about making things so affordable that anyone can afford them easily. Take, for example, government schools. Education at that level should cost a tiny fraction of the 10k a year per student that those schools get in tax dollars. Anyone should be able to afford it. But thanks to welfare, the costs are inflated. Instead of poor people paying a low cost, taxpayers pay a high cost. Healthcare is the same. If there was no medicaid, then poor people would only be able to afford low fees. Doctors and drug companies would have a huge incentive to lower costs. Poor people would end up paying low costs, instead of what we have today, which is tax payers paying high costs. Areas without welfare see low costs. While the costs of old medical technology rises, as shown with the price increases in Epipen, the cost of computer technology continually drops. That's not because medicines are largely chemical, and computers are largely electronic. It's because one gets welfare and the other doesn't. Poor people serve a vital role in any economy. Because they are usually the most price sensitive, they put constant downward pressure on prices. Because poor people can only afford say, $40 for a computer, there are computers that cost $40. If it wasn't for them, there would be no reason to sell cheap computers - or cheap food, clothes, or entertainment. Poor people lower the costs for all of us. Because every penny matters to them, companies have incentives to find ways to lower prices by a cent or two. Over time, this adds up, and prices fall in ways that benefit us all. Welfare takes away that downward pressure. That's why in areas where you have welfare - healthcare, public schools, college financial aid, prices are sky high. In areas without welfare - computers, etc. - prices keep falling. Ending welfare helps everyone. If elected, I will end welfare. Respectfully, Arvin Vohra https://facebook.com/VohraEducation/ Candidate for President Author of Pull Out: Men, Modern Life, and Mutiny
12 views ·