1. It’s one of the most stressed joints in your body For every pound you weigh, your knees receive four times the amount of stress. This is why if you’re overweight or obese, losing weight is essential to protecting knee health — especially if you suffer from osteoarthritis and knee dislocations. 2. Knees absorb a lot of shock on a daily basis Many activities that you do without a second thought — such as walking, going up and down the stairs, jumping, and running — may be great forms of exercise. However, if you don’t ease into it gradually, your knees become more prone to injuries. 3. Everyone has unique kneecaps It’s general knowledge that everyone’s fingerprints and retinas are unique. Turns out that kneecaps can also be used as biometrics. Granted, the identification process would require an MRI machine. 4. Knees are the most complicated joint in the body While to the naked eye, the knees may just look like a ball-shaped patella cradled between two larger bones, the joint is composed of the femur (thigh bone), patella (knee cap), and the top section of the tibia (the shin bone). All of it is held in place by tendons and ligaments — and in between all of it, there’s cartilage. Even within the ligaments, you have the Anterior Cruciate Ligament (ACL) and the Medial Collateral Ligament (MCL). 5. Having diabetes could make them more prone to injury A person with Type II diabetes is twice as likely to develop osteoarthritis, which causes the breakdown of the cartilage that cushions joints. And, since many Type II diabetics are overweight, the joints in the lower body — especially the knees — bear the brunt of the stress, making them more prone to injury 6. Knees rely on 10 muscles to function Knees rely on quadriceps, which contain four muscles — rectus femoris, vastus lateralis, vastus intermedius, and vastus medialis. Hamstrings also refer to another group of muscles — semitendinosus, semimembranosus, and biceps femoris. Hip abductors, glute muscles, and calf muscles also work together to stabilize the knee joint. Strengthening these muscles can help alleviate the daily weight-bearing stresses experienced by the knees. 7. Exercise keeps them healthy Going on long walks, using the stairs instead of the elevator, or riding a bicycle are all great forms to promote knee health. This is because extended periods of inactivity cause soft tissue to become tight and weak — which could lead to a condition called chondromalacia of the patella, which is irritation of the cartilage lining the kneecaps. 8. Wearing the wrong shoes can damage them Wearing shoes that are worn-out or that fail to offer adequate support can increase pressure on the knees. Knowing which shoes would work best for you depends on your specific circumstances — do you have arthritis? Have you had a knee replacement surgery? Does your job require you to be on your feet all day? Are you a long-distance runner? If any of these circumstances apply to you, talk to your doctor about which types of shoes would suit you best. 9. Warming up and stretching can prevent knee injuries Warming up before any type of physical activity — even brisk walking — gives your knees the opportunity to adapt to the repetitive movement, which is crucial in injury prevention. As a bonus, it also helps you improve your athletic performance. 10. Babies are born without kneecaps When babies are born, their knee joints are made out of cartilage. They don’t turn into bones until between the ages of two and six. Having most of their body made out of cartilage makes the birthing process easier.

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There are a total of 22 bones in the skull. The skull is not only made up of bones but also cartilages and ligaments. The facial skeleton does not include the teeth and the cartilage of the nose. The skull contains foramina or canals scattered throughout the skull bones. There is only one bone in the skull that is movable and it is the jaw bone or mandible. In a forensic study, you can tell if the skull belongs to male or female. Make skulls are heavier, larger, and thicker than the female skulls. The skull of a female is rounded and less protruded mandible. Every human skull has fractals or sutures of the skull. The bones of the skull are divided into the cranium and facial bones. Cranium has a total of eight bones while the facial bones have a total of 14 bones. The biggest hole in the skull is found in the area of the vertebral column that joins the skull’s base. It is the foramen magnum. An average of 785 pounds is needed to crush a human skull. A skull with crossbones is used as a symbol of poison or death.

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1. Breasts get fat. In your 20s, your boobs are made up of fat, milk glands and collagen -- the connective tissue that keeps them firm. "But as you age, the glands and collagen shrink and are replaced by more and more fat," explains Laurie A. Casas, a plastic surgeon and associate professor of surgery at Northwestern Feinberg School of Medicine. Instead of making your bra size go up, however, the added flab can send breasts down, closer to the floor, if you catch our drift. Wearing an underwire bra (whether you're an A-cup or a D) can help fight sagging over time. 2. But they weigh less than you think. That surge in the scale isn't your set's fault: An A-cup clocks in at only a quarter pound; a B, about half a pound; a C, three-quarters of a pound; and a D, around one pound. 3. They're thin-skinned. "Because they were stretched as you developed, breasts have thinner skin than the rest of your body, leaving them susceptible to dryness," says Laurie Polis, a dermatologist in New York City. Keep your pair supple by moisturizing them with a firming cream that stimulates collagen and elastin growth and has UV protection and retinol to prevent wrinkling. Don't ignore your nipples either; they're also prone to dryness. Give them a daily dose of a superemollient moisturizer, like Vaseline or Aquaphor. 4. Stray strands are normal. Almost all women have some degree of nipple hair. "Having 2 to 15 dark, straight strands growing at one time is extremely common," explains Debra Jaliman, M.D., a clinical instructor of dermatology at Mount Sinai School of Medicine in New York City. The general rule is, the darker your skin and the hair on your head, the more nipple hair you'll have. If the hair bothers you, waxing it away is fine. But if you have only a few strands, it's easier to tweeze: Clean the area with alcohol, pluck each hair, then wipe down the affected skin with an antibacterial lotion to prevent infection. That should give you a week or two before you have to break out the tweezers again. 5. Each pair has its own point. Not only do nipples come in varying sizes, they also point in different directions. "Whether your nipples go up, down, left or right depends on their structure and where the areolae sit on the breasts," says Dr. Casas. "Some areolae rest a little higher, which can angle the nipples upward. Others rest lower or are closer to the edges of the breasts." Some women even sport a pair that aim in opposing directions. 6. They have their own monthly cycle. "Fluctuating hormones cause your breast tissue to change week by week," explains Hilda Hutcherson, M.D., associate professor of obstetrics and gynecology at Columbia University. In the days after your period, breast tissue feels smoothest, thanks to even hormone levels. Midcycle, your nipples may become more sexually sensitive, due to increased estrogen levels. Finally, the week before and during your period, extra progesterone may leave your set swollen, bumpy and tender. Popping an OTC painkiller and cutting back on caffeine can help quell the ache. 7. There's a right time to take them to the doctor. Because your boobs are at their smoothest and least tender the week after your period, it's the best time to have your gyno check out any unusual lumpiness or swelling. "Your doc will have an easier time diagnosing the problem because it'll be easier to detect something abnormal," says Dr. Hutcherson

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1. Their sense of smell is at least 40x better than ours The area of cells in the brain that detect different smells is around 40 times larger in dogs than humans. This means that your dog can pick up on way more smells than we ever could. This is why dogs are often used to sniff out people, drugs and even money! 2. Some have such good noses they can sniff out medical problems Yup, medical detection dogs are a thing. Because their sense of smell is so great, some dogs can be trained to sniff out medical conditions. They are used to diagnose a particular condition or to alert their owners if they need more medication. Some are even being trained to sniff out Covid-19! 3. Dogs can sniff at the same time as breathing Dogs rely a lot on their sense of smell to find food, potential dangers, and friends, so needless to say they sniff a lot. Their noses are designed so smells can stay in their nose while air can move in and out of their lungs at the same time, which means they can breathe freely and still work out what that smell is! 4. Some dogs are incredible swimmers So, not all dogs like water, but the ones that do tend to be pretty good swimmers (but again, not all are so always keep an eye on your dog in case they decide to take a dip out and about).

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More from King Joseph

There are a total of 22 bones in the skull. The skull is not only made up of bones but also cartilages and ligaments. The facial skeleton does not include the teeth and the cartilage of the nose. The skull contains foramina or canals scattered throughout the skull bones. There is only one bone in the skull that is movable and it is the jaw bone or mandible. In a forensic study, you can tell if the skull belongs to male or female. Make skulls are heavier, larger, and thicker than the female skulls. The skull of a female is rounded and less protruded mandible. Every human skull has fractals or sutures of the skull. The bones of the skull are divided into the cranium and facial bones. Cranium has a total of eight bones while the facial bones have a total of 14 bones. The biggest hole in the skull is found in the area of the vertebral column that joins the skull’s base. It is the foramen magnum. An average of 785 pounds is needed to crush a human skull. A skull with crossbones is used as a symbol of poison or death.

329 views ·

1. Breasts get fat. In your 20s, your boobs are made up of fat, milk glands and collagen -- the connective tissue that keeps them firm. "But as you age, the glands and collagen shrink and are replaced by more and more fat," explains Laurie A. Casas, a plastic surgeon and associate professor of surgery at Northwestern Feinberg School of Medicine. Instead of making your bra size go up, however, the added flab can send breasts down, closer to the floor, if you catch our drift. Wearing an underwire bra (whether you're an A-cup or a D) can help fight sagging over time. 2. But they weigh less than you think. That surge in the scale isn't your set's fault: An A-cup clocks in at only a quarter pound; a B, about half a pound; a C, three-quarters of a pound; and a D, around one pound. 3. They're thin-skinned. "Because they were stretched as you developed, breasts have thinner skin than the rest of your body, leaving them susceptible to dryness," says Laurie Polis, a dermatologist in New York City. Keep your pair supple by moisturizing them with a firming cream that stimulates collagen and elastin growth and has UV protection and retinol to prevent wrinkling. Don't ignore your nipples either; they're also prone to dryness. Give them a daily dose of a superemollient moisturizer, like Vaseline or Aquaphor. 4. Stray strands are normal. Almost all women have some degree of nipple hair. "Having 2 to 15 dark, straight strands growing at one time is extremely common," explains Debra Jaliman, M.D., a clinical instructor of dermatology at Mount Sinai School of Medicine in New York City. The general rule is, the darker your skin and the hair on your head, the more nipple hair you'll have. If the hair bothers you, waxing it away is fine. But if you have only a few strands, it's easier to tweeze: Clean the area with alcohol, pluck each hair, then wipe down the affected skin with an antibacterial lotion to prevent infection. That should give you a week or two before you have to break out the tweezers again. 5. Each pair has its own point. Not only do nipples come in varying sizes, they also point in different directions. "Whether your nipples go up, down, left or right depends on their structure and where the areolae sit on the breasts," says Dr. Casas. "Some areolae rest a little higher, which can angle the nipples upward. Others rest lower or are closer to the edges of the breasts." Some women even sport a pair that aim in opposing directions. 6. They have their own monthly cycle. "Fluctuating hormones cause your breast tissue to change week by week," explains Hilda Hutcherson, M.D., associate professor of obstetrics and gynecology at Columbia University. In the days after your period, breast tissue feels smoothest, thanks to even hormone levels. Midcycle, your nipples may become more sexually sensitive, due to increased estrogen levels. Finally, the week before and during your period, extra progesterone may leave your set swollen, bumpy and tender. Popping an OTC painkiller and cutting back on caffeine can help quell the ache. 7. There's a right time to take them to the doctor. Because your boobs are at their smoothest and least tender the week after your period, it's the best time to have your gyno check out any unusual lumpiness or swelling. "Your doc will have an easier time diagnosing the problem because it'll be easier to detect something abnormal," says Dr. Hutcherson

337 views ·

1. Their sense of smell is at least 40x better than ours The area of cells in the brain that detect different smells is around 40 times larger in dogs than humans. This means that your dog can pick up on way more smells than we ever could. This is why dogs are often used to sniff out people, drugs and even money! 2. Some have such good noses they can sniff out medical problems Yup, medical detection dogs are a thing. Because their sense of smell is so great, some dogs can be trained to sniff out medical conditions. They are used to diagnose a particular condition or to alert their owners if they need more medication. Some are even being trained to sniff out Covid-19! 3. Dogs can sniff at the same time as breathing Dogs rely a lot on their sense of smell to find food, potential dangers, and friends, so needless to say they sniff a lot. Their noses are designed so smells can stay in their nose while air can move in and out of their lungs at the same time, which means they can breathe freely and still work out what that smell is! 4. Some dogs are incredible swimmers So, not all dogs like water, but the ones that do tend to be pretty good swimmers (but again, not all are so always keep an eye on your dog in case they decide to take a dip out and about).

303 views ·