Tunisia could be without 12 players for their pivotal Africa Cup of Nations Group F game against The Gambia on Thursday because of coronavirus. Captain Wahbi Khazri, who scored two goals in his country's 4-0 win over Mauritania on Sunday and set up another, is among seven players who have tested positive. The Carthage Eagles need at least a point against The Gambia to have a chance to progress as one of four best third-placed sides, while victory would secure a spot in the last 16. Defender Ali Maaloul and midfielder Ghaylene Chaalali, who both started against the Mourabitounes, will also be missing along with Mohamed Ali Ben Romdhane, Mohamed Amine Ben Hamida and goalkeepers Aymen Dahmen and Ali Jemal.

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255 views ·

Carrie Davies, BBC correspondent in Moscow In Russia, state-run newspapers and media outlets blame the West for aggression, mirroring the Kremlin's language. While the defence alliance, Nato, and the US warn of an imminent invasion, many people are still unconvinced that war will happen or that it would be to Russia's advantage. In central Moscow, some think that the threat has been exaggerated by the West. "Every year, according to them, Russia plans to invade Ukraine," said 24-year-old Andrei. "Meanwhile, we all sit here and listen to the news with eyes wide open and think: 'Really? Again? Weren't we supposed to invade last year?' I think the West is just using this issue for their own interests."

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