Photo by Thomas Peschak thomaspeschak | Dassen Island, off South Africa’s west coast, was one of the few places in the world where penguins and rabbits interacted on a daily basis. Both species nested and bred in burrows dug into the sandy island soil. I made this photograph in the early 2000s, and this scene no longer exists today. African penguin numbers declined dramatically, due to a lack of their preferred fish prey, caused by overfishing and changes in oceanography. For more photographs of rabbit and penguin antics follow thomaspeschak.

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