Aaaand I can't boost again. It was good while it lasted...

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Crew members, assemble STARSHATTER Review I’m going to try not to be THAT guy. Which guy? THAT guy. You know, the guy that gets you to sit down and watch the movie he just saw that he really likes, but then talks all through the movie, spoiling the plot, spoiling the surprises, explaining things that you could figure out on your own. I mean, figuring it out on your own and being surprised is all the fun, aint it? "Snape did WHAT?!?!" What I’m going to try to do instead is to nudge you into the dark theater on your own to experience it for yourself. To do this I’m going to give you a mirrored view through other works. The first time I was introduced to the idea of Uplifting was in the Arthur C Clarke book Dolphin Island. The idea that an already intelligent species can be advanced on their path to self-awareness and personal autonomy faster than nature’s slow and plodding speed offered. In Clarke’s book it was only the beginning stages and confined to Earth alone. Simple communication between humans, dolphins, and their larger cousins, the orca. Later in my life David Brin extrapolated on the idea in his books Sundiver, Startide Rising and The Uplift War and moved it all into space. All fantastic books and highly recommended. Starshatter has moved the whole idea into it’s logical conclusion, though Brin’s universe and Black Knight’s are not connected save by the idea of Uplifting client species. Starshatter is also in an alternate timeline where earth's future was changed somewhere in the late 20th century. In this timeline some universal powers use the client races as slaves and cannon fodder while others defend their newfound intelligence and autonomy. The themes of Honor, personal autonomy, the right to live and thrive, are all at the forefront of the introductions to characters in this first book of many. If Akira Kurosawa imagined an entire universe instead of just feudal Japan, Seven Samurai might have looked something like Starshatter. Seven Samurai was the original movie trope that found separate characters, expounded on their origins, and threw them together in a battle. People of Honor, and strengths each uniquely their own, come together to form a whole greater than the sum of their parts. Starshatter is the introduction to a universe of multiple civilizations, multiple races and systems of belief that form alliances of the strong against one another in pursuit of either the protection of, or of the taking advantage, of the weak. Honor, Sacrifice, and Freedom are recurring themes that deserve the capital letters, if you take my meaning. I love a good story. One of the most important things about a good story, aside from the content and characters, is the storyteller. It took me a few chapters to realize one of the oddities of this particular tale, and that is the lack of dialogue, as the story is moved forward through action and description more than dialogue between characters. As the Dark Knight (perhaps one day we’ll find out who the man behind the visor is) spins his tale, he tells us the actions, the backgrounds, thoughts, origins and the path of the separate and unique characters of his universe, but there is very little communication between them and their surroundings. Most likely because each character, as they are introduced, are on their own adventure, their own quest. Alone in their battles, as the bit players pass them by on the characters way to their final destination to become part of a new whole. Oh, and the ordnance. “Fuel is Life” and weaponry will make the difference between walking out of a battle and being vaporized. I love the attention to detail on the the weapons, the armor, and the spacecraft. One doesn’t let the enemies fuel or supplies go to waste. In this part of space it’s a long way between refueling ports and armories so you take what you can get. Nothing goes to waste. I like the realistic view of having to scavenge for supplies in the almost infinite distances of space. It also lends to the eventual morphing of this series into either a video game or tabletop role playing game. So many races, classes, weapons, spacecraft. Much like the universe at large, this series has nowhere to go but out into the infinite possibilities of imagination. Some might try to rate a book by 1-5 stars or some other acknowledged system but I rate my books by dog-ears. You know, that little corner you fold at the top of the page. Mine has many. When I first read the Conan books, the Elric books, the several books that made up The Chronicles of Amber, they were all thin, separate publications that were later turned into collections. I am waiting for the day where the first three books, Starshatter, Twin Suns of Carolla and Treads of Vengeance are considered the first book of the Starshatter series. Admittedly I have only read the first book so far, I can see where it will eventually be seen as the beginning third of the first novel. So come. "Greet me as I come with intent to protect." Join our crew. We have cats! https://www.minds.com/groups/profile/1232107577420779520/feed #myphoto #photography #starshatter #books #ScienceFiction @Aragmar

More from Aragmar

Crew members, assemble STARSHATTER Review I’m going to try not to be THAT guy. Which guy? THAT guy. You know, the guy that gets you to sit down and watch the movie he just saw that he really likes, but then talks all through the movie, spoiling the plot, spoiling the surprises, explaining things that you could figure out on your own. I mean, figuring it out on your own and being surprised is all the fun, aint it? "Snape did WHAT?!?!" What I’m going to try to do instead is to nudge you into the dark theater on your own to experience it for yourself. To do this I’m going to give you a mirrored view through other works. The first time I was introduced to the idea of Uplifting was in the Arthur C Clarke book Dolphin Island. The idea that an already intelligent species can be advanced on their path to self-awareness and personal autonomy faster than nature’s slow and plodding speed offered. In Clarke’s book it was only the beginning stages and confined to Earth alone. Simple communication between humans, dolphins, and their larger cousins, the orca. Later in my life David Brin extrapolated on the idea in his books Sundiver, Startide Rising and The Uplift War and moved it all into space. All fantastic books and highly recommended. Starshatter has moved the whole idea into it’s logical conclusion, though Brin’s universe and Black Knight’s are not connected save by the idea of Uplifting client species. Starshatter is also in an alternate timeline where earth's future was changed somewhere in the late 20th century. In this timeline some universal powers use the client races as slaves and cannon fodder while others defend their newfound intelligence and autonomy. The themes of Honor, personal autonomy, the right to live and thrive, are all at the forefront of the introductions to characters in this first book of many. If Akira Kurosawa imagined an entire universe instead of just feudal Japan, Seven Samurai might have looked something like Starshatter. Seven Samurai was the original movie trope that found separate characters, expounded on their origins, and threw them together in a battle. People of Honor, and strengths each uniquely their own, come together to form a whole greater than the sum of their parts. Starshatter is the introduction to a universe of multiple civilizations, multiple races and systems of belief that form alliances of the strong against one another in pursuit of either the protection of, or of the taking advantage, of the weak. Honor, Sacrifice, and Freedom are recurring themes that deserve the capital letters, if you take my meaning. I love a good story. One of the most important things about a good story, aside from the content and characters, is the storyteller. It took me a few chapters to realize one of the oddities of this particular tale, and that is the lack of dialogue, as the story is moved forward through action and description more than dialogue between characters. As the Dark Knight (perhaps one day we’ll find out who the man behind the visor is) spins his tale, he tells us the actions, the backgrounds, thoughts, origins and the path of the separate and unique characters of his universe, but there is very little communication between them and their surroundings. Most likely because each character, as they are introduced, are on their own adventure, their own quest. Alone in their battles, as the bit players pass them by on the characters way to their final destination to become part of a new whole. Oh, and the ordnance. “Fuel is Life” and weaponry will make the difference between walking out of a battle and being vaporized. I love the attention to detail on the the weapons, the armor, and the spacecraft. One doesn’t let the enemies fuel or supplies go to waste. In this part of space it’s a long way between refueling ports and armories so you take what you can get. Nothing goes to waste. I like the realistic view of having to scavenge for supplies in the almost infinite distances of space. It also lends to the eventual morphing of this series into either a video game or tabletop role playing game. So many races, classes, weapons, spacecraft. Much like the universe at large, this series has nowhere to go but out into the infinite possibilities of imagination. Some might try to rate a book by 1-5 stars or some other acknowledged system but I rate my books by dog-ears. You know, that little corner you fold at the top of the page. Mine has many. When I first read the Conan books, the Elric books, the several books that made up The Chronicles of Amber, they were all thin, separate publications that were later turned into collections. I am waiting for the day where the first three books, Starshatter, Twin Suns of Carolla and Treads of Vengeance are considered the first book of the Starshatter series. Admittedly I have only read the first book so far, I can see where it will eventually be seen as the beginning third of the first novel. So come. "Greet me as I come with intent to protect." Join our crew. We have cats! https://www.minds.com/groups/profile/1232107577420779520/feed #myphoto #photography #starshatter #books #ScienceFiction @Aragmar