Fukushima Supermarket Sells Earthquake-Damaged Beers as “Heroes” One such business was the Happy Food RE Fanz supermarket in Date City, Fukushima, where the quake registered as a Magnitude 6. A part of their ceiling collapsed and several items were shaken off their shelves, including cans of beer and various alcopops which were dented as a result. Even without natural disasters, dented cans are a regular occurrence and normally get placed in a special “damaged goods” discount bin. However, the clerk in charge of the liquor section at this supermarket, Yohei Sato, felt they deserved better after all they’ve been through. In the center of the section stood each banged-up can proudly with the following sign: “These are the heroes who bravely stood up to the earthquake. I don’t want them to be treated like fallen and damaged products that sell at a discount. They look different but they have delicious alcohol on the inside. Please take them with you and let them live out their lives as delicious alcohol.” Underneath the sign is a drawing of a wounded can shouting; “We will not be beaten by the earthquake!!” These drinks were all being sold at their regular price in honor of their survival, and despite this, they’ve been selling well. One woman in her 80s who was interviewed while buying a heroic beer told NHK, “The stuff inside is the same, and once you drink it you throw away the can anyway, so I think this is a good idea.” Sato was also quoted as saying, “The alcohol is more like my children than products. It makes me happy to see people put the dented cans in their baskets, knowing that they will go out and be enjoyed.”

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