This is a the opening track from my band's most recent album King Dork Approximately the Album, which is a "soundtrack" to the novels King Dork and King Dork Approximately. Basically, the narrator of the books writes songs, and the conceit of this record is that my band has recorded versions of these songs. A real-life band (well sort of real) covering imaginary songs written by a fictional character -- say anything, at least it's weird. It was originally released digital-only as a download that came with the paperback edition of King Dork Approximately, but subsequently released on vinyl and CD by Sounds Radical. https://youtu.be/mBzhUGXA76c The bare bones of this song had been kicking around for quite some years before I decided tack them together and incorporate them into King Dork Approximately, the novel. We may even have tried to play some rudimentary version of it at some point back in the 90s -- if so, though, it was never more than a quarter-baked and couldn't have come together anywhere near as well as it did here. Of all the songs we've recorded, this recording and arrangement probably comes closest to the thing I heard in my head before being humblingly brought crashing to earth by the force of reality. The idea of doing a song about teenage girls' "creative" re-spellings of their own names had been kicking around for many years, and I wrote the character Cinthya into the book King Dork Approximately mainly so I would be spurred finally to finish the song. It's got some good lines, and great rhymes, if I say it myself ("double M" / "trouble them" "double u" / "trouble you") but what really makes it work is the trick of casting it not as lazy ridicule of this cultural phenomenon as it might have been, but rather as a celebration of and apologia for it. That wasn't a feature of the original song, but once I started thinking of it that way everything kind of slid into place. I love it when that happens. Alizabeth or fight! The punknews.org review of KDATA referred to this material as "somewhere halfway between the Ramones and AC/DC" and built for Madison Square Garden sized crowds, a context in which it would never be played, which is certainly the case. But we sure do have fun playing it anyway. I don't do a whole lot of actual guitar solos these days, but it's probably the one I'm most pleased with of the ones I have done. Anyway, you can find my books here: https://www.soundsradical.com/store/c5/Books.html And the records, as well as other stuff, may be found here: https://www.soundsradical.com/store1.html #music #songs #product #books #youngadultfiction #rockandroll #guitar #mrtexperience #mtxforever #minds
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Atomic Rooster - Devil's Answer: the Singles Collection, Earmark 41052, 2006 Just as a kind of follow-up to @NormBauer's recent post on Atomic Rooster, here's a box set of the AR 1970s singles, on the Italian Earmark label. I acquired it when searching for a copy of the original version of the song "Devil's Answer". The song, originally released as a single only in the UK, was added to the US release of the In Hearing of... album, but that version has dubbed-in vox by new singer Pete French. French was a dynamic vocalist, but I vastly prefer the original, whose more prosaic, understated delivery (from John Du Cann but "ganged up" in the recording) gives it a darker, and I think more convincingly devilish, tone and feel. "Devil's Answer" aside, all this material is top notch, and as good a way as any to sample the largely uncategorizable greatness of the this under-recognized band. The first five singles take you on a journey, two years in the life of the band (1970-72) but covering lots of territory. The post-psych hard rock grows ever more funky and "heavy soul" tinged, with an increasing art rock orchestral "prog" edge as well -- and in fact the fifth A-side, "Save Me", is a much heavier more soul-ified re-recording of the first, "Friday the 13th." The sixth 7", curiously credited to Crane / Farlow [sic] but whose tracks appear on the final AR album of the 70s Nice 'n' Greasy, consists of introspective, moody, heavily orchestrated and piano-driven tracks that sound like an elegiac coda to what had come before. "Can't Find a Reason" is grimly affecting, the flip ("Moods") a rather beautiful mostly-solo piano workout with a swelling of that characteristic rough-yet-understated AR funk just near the end. The band would return in the 80s (which is a whole 'nother story) but this sure sounds like the end. Of something. notes: -- box set on discogs: https://www.discogs.com/Atomic-Rooster-Devils-Answer-The-Singles-Collection/release/4068895 -- "Devil's Answer" single version: https://youtu.be/fKZQbaxrGY8 -- "Devil's Answer" album version with dubbed in Pete French vox: https://youtu.be/inLxeuKfdAs -- "Devil's Answer" on Top of the Pops: https://youtu.be/O75iSwHnx-Y #music #vinyl #vinylcollector #minds

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More from frankportman

Atomic Rooster - Devil's Answer: the Singles Collection, Earmark 41052, 2006 Just as a kind of follow-up to @NormBauer's recent post on Atomic Rooster, here's a box set of the AR 1970s singles, on the Italian Earmark label. I acquired it when searching for a copy of the original version of the song "Devil's Answer". The song, originally released as a single only in the UK, was added to the US release of the In Hearing of... album, but that version has dubbed-in vox by new singer Pete French. French was a dynamic vocalist, but I vastly prefer the original, whose more prosaic, understated delivery (from John Du Cann but "ganged up" in the recording) gives it a darker, and I think more convincingly devilish, tone and feel. "Devil's Answer" aside, all this material is top notch, and as good a way as any to sample the largely uncategorizable greatness of the this under-recognized band. The first five singles take you on a journey, two years in the life of the band (1970-72) but covering lots of territory. The post-psych hard rock grows ever more funky and "heavy soul" tinged, with an increasing art rock orchestral "prog" edge as well -- and in fact the fifth A-side, "Save Me", is a much heavier more soul-ified re-recording of the first, "Friday the 13th." The sixth 7", curiously credited to Crane / Farlow [sic] but whose tracks appear on the final AR album of the 70s Nice 'n' Greasy, consists of introspective, moody, heavily orchestrated and piano-driven tracks that sound like an elegiac coda to what had come before. "Can't Find a Reason" is grimly affecting, the flip ("Moods") a rather beautiful mostly-solo piano workout with a swelling of that characteristic rough-yet-understated AR funk just near the end. The band would return in the 80s (which is a whole 'nother story) but this sure sounds like the end. Of something. notes: -- box set on discogs: https://www.discogs.com/Atomic-Rooster-Devils-Answer-The-Singles-Collection/release/4068895 -- "Devil's Answer" single version: https://youtu.be/fKZQbaxrGY8 -- "Devil's Answer" album version with dubbed in Pete French vox: https://youtu.be/inLxeuKfdAs -- "Devil's Answer" on Top of the Pops: https://youtu.be/O75iSwHnx-Y #music #vinyl #vinylcollector #minds

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