**CALLING ALL PROGRAMMERS** [HUG06] **Dominic HUGHES**, Proofs without syntax, *Annals of mathematics*, 164(3):1065-1076, 8.2004. Excellent paper that was published a few years back! Relating it to the book: [LAM03] **Leslie LAMPORT**, *Specifying systems*, Boston: Addison Wesley, 2003. You can get Leslie's book on his website at: http://lamport.azurewebsites.net/tla/book.html His program TLA toolbox for automatically checking algorithm proofs written in TLA+ is at: http://lamport.azurewebsites.net/tla/toolbox.html Oh: and he he made lectures, so you can watch if you don't want to read: http://lamport.azurewebsites.net/video/videos.html :thumbsup:
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