It's true, they haven't caught or prevented a single terrorist attack. The underwear bomber and the shoe bomber both got past TSA. As a matter of fact, if you really want to see what the TSA is best at, go to any search engine and type in "TSA caught stealing."

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What a lovely piece of propaganda. For the low, low price of $85, you can avoid some of the molestation you're expected to endure at the airport. You can even keep your shoes on! I'm sure that if there were terrorists that wanted to try to blow up a plane with explosives in their shoes they surely wouldn't be able to come up with $85. I'm not sure what good fingerprints and a background check would do to stop a suicidal maniac from blowing your plane out of the sky, but TSA isn't about security anyway, it's about control, and conditioning the populace to forget about their rights affirmed by the 4th Amendment. https://www.msn.com/en-us/travel/article/not-signing-up-for-tsa-precheck-is-a-big-mistake-heres-why/ar-BBKu1TK?ocid=spartanntp
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liberty (n.) late 14c., "free choice, freedom to do as one chooses," also "freedom from the bondage of sin," from Old French liberte "freedom, liberty, free will" (14c., Modern French liberté), from Latin libertatem (nominative libertas) "civil or political freedom, condition of a free man; absence of restraint; permission," from liber "free" (see liberal (adj.)). At first of persons; of communities, "state of being free from arbitrary, despotic, or autocratic rule or control" is from late 15c. The French notion of liberty is political equality; the English notion is personal independence. [William R. Greg, "France in January 1852" in "Miscellaneous Essays"] Nautical sense of "leave of absence" is from 1758. Meaning "unrestrained action, conduct, or expression" (1550s) led to take liberties "go beyond the bounds of propriety" (1620s). Sense of "privileges by grant" (14c.) led to sense of "a person's private land" (mid-15c.), within which certain special privileges may be exercised, which yielded in 18c. in both England and America a sense of "a district within a county but having its own justice of the peace," and also "a district adjacent to a city and in some degree under its municipal jurisdiction" (as in Northern Liberties of Philadelphia). Also compare Old French libertés "local rights, laws, taxes." Liberty-cap is from 1803; the American Revolutionary liberty-pole, "tall flagstaff set up in honor of liberty and often surmounted by a liberty-cap" is from 1775. Liberty-cabbage was a World War I U.S. jingoistic euphemism for sauerkraut. https://www.etymonline.com/word/liberty
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More from Tea Flavored Harbor Water

What a lovely piece of propaganda. For the low, low price of $85, you can avoid some of the molestation you're expected to endure at the airport. You can even keep your shoes on! I'm sure that if there were terrorists that wanted to try to blow up a plane with explosives in their shoes they surely wouldn't be able to come up with $85. I'm not sure what good fingerprints and a background check would do to stop a suicidal maniac from blowing your plane out of the sky, but TSA isn't about security anyway, it's about control, and conditioning the populace to forget about their rights affirmed by the 4th Amendment. https://www.msn.com/en-us/travel/article/not-signing-up-for-tsa-precheck-is-a-big-mistake-heres-why/ar-BBKu1TK?ocid=spartanntp
38 views ·
60 views ·
liberty (n.) late 14c., "free choice, freedom to do as one chooses," also "freedom from the bondage of sin," from Old French liberte "freedom, liberty, free will" (14c., Modern French liberté), from Latin libertatem (nominative libertas) "civil or political freedom, condition of a free man; absence of restraint; permission," from liber "free" (see liberal (adj.)). At first of persons; of communities, "state of being free from arbitrary, despotic, or autocratic rule or control" is from late 15c. The French notion of liberty is political equality; the English notion is personal independence. [William R. Greg, "France in January 1852" in "Miscellaneous Essays"] Nautical sense of "leave of absence" is from 1758. Meaning "unrestrained action, conduct, or expression" (1550s) led to take liberties "go beyond the bounds of propriety" (1620s). Sense of "privileges by grant" (14c.) led to sense of "a person's private land" (mid-15c.), within which certain special privileges may be exercised, which yielded in 18c. in both England and America a sense of "a district within a county but having its own justice of the peace," and also "a district adjacent to a city and in some degree under its municipal jurisdiction" (as in Northern Liberties of Philadelphia). Also compare Old French libertés "local rights, laws, taxes." Liberty-cap is from 1803; the American Revolutionary liberty-pole, "tall flagstaff set up in honor of liberty and often surmounted by a liberty-cap" is from 1775. Liberty-cabbage was a World War I U.S. jingoistic euphemism for sauerkraut. https://www.etymonline.com/word/liberty
24 views ·