HAIR DESIGN. THEY ARE DOING AMAZING WORKS NOW.

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The First Clock in America Failed and Revolutionized Physics The pendulum didn't quite work when they brought it here: the beginning of a fascinating story.As seen here at the Comtoise Museum by master watchmaker Bernd Deckert, Comtoise clocks are a French pendulum clock from the Franch-Comte region of France. While they are beautiful antiques, they are also incredibly functional, calibrating correctly, keeping time for a month with no more than a minute's loss of accuracy. (Image alliance via Horst Ossinger/Getty Images) For nearly three centuries, the pendulum clock was the most accurate way for mankind to keep track of time. From its initial development in the 17th century to the invention of quartz clocks in the 1920s, pendulum clocks formed the basis of domestic life, allowing people to organize their schedules according to a universally accepted standard. First invented in the Netherlands by Christian Huygens in 1656, their early designs were quickly developed to greatly increase their precision. But something strange happened when the first pendulum clock was brought to America. Working perfectly in keeping the time accurate in Europe, the watch can be synchronized with known astronomical events such as sunset/sunrise and moonset/moonrise. But after just a week or two in America, it was clear that the clock wasn't keeping time properly. The first watch in America was a total failure, but it is only the beginning of a story that will revolutionize our understanding of the physics of planet Earth.The first sketch of a pendulum clock concept was by Galileo Galilei, who tried to exploit the uniform period of a swinging pendulum to create a working timekeeping machine. The device was not completed by neither Galileo nor his son, and the first pendulum clock was made by Christiaan Huygens in 1656. (DE AGOSTINI VIA GETTY IMAGES)

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I THINK IT IS NECESSARY TO MAKE SUCH CRAFTS.BECAUSE IT IS THERAPY

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The First Clock in America Failed and Revolutionized Physics The pendulum didn't quite work when they brought it here: the beginning of a fascinating story.As seen here at the Comtoise Museum by master watchmaker Bernd Deckert, Comtoise clocks are a French pendulum clock from the Franch-Comte region of France. While they are beautiful antiques, they are also incredibly functional, calibrating correctly, keeping time for a month with no more than a minute's loss of accuracy. (Image alliance via Horst Ossinger/Getty Images) For nearly three centuries, the pendulum clock was the most accurate way for mankind to keep track of time. From its initial development in the 17th century to the invention of quartz clocks in the 1920s, pendulum clocks formed the basis of domestic life, allowing people to organize their schedules according to a universally accepted standard. First invented in the Netherlands by Christian Huygens in 1656, their early designs were quickly developed to greatly increase their precision. But something strange happened when the first pendulum clock was brought to America. Working perfectly in keeping the time accurate in Europe, the watch can be synchronized with known astronomical events such as sunset/sunrise and moonset/moonrise. But after just a week or two in America, it was clear that the clock wasn't keeping time properly. The first watch in America was a total failure, but it is only the beginning of a story that will revolutionize our understanding of the physics of planet Earth.The first sketch of a pendulum clock concept was by Galileo Galilei, who tried to exploit the uniform period of a swinging pendulum to create a working timekeeping machine. The device was not completed by neither Galileo nor his son, and the first pendulum clock was made by Christiaan Huygens in 1656. (DE AGOSTINI VIA GETTY IMAGES)

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