Morning Viewers 馃挅馃槝 Our review today is on this beautiful Animal called Zebra, Please endeavor to drop your comment in the comment section Thanks 馃槝. Zebras (UK: /藞z蓻br蓹z/, US: /藞zi藧br蓹z/) (subgenus Hippotigris) are African equines with distinctive black-and-white striped coats. There are three living species: the Gr茅vy's zebra (Equus grevyi), plains zebra (E. quagga), and the mountain zebra (E. zebra). Zebras share the genus Equus with horses and asses, the three groups being the only living members of the family Equidae. Zebra stripes come in different patterns, unique to each individual. Several theories have been proposed for the function of these stripes, with most evidence supporting them as a deterrent for biting flies. Zebras inhabit eastern and southern Africa and can be found in a variety of habitats such as savannahs, grasslands, woodlands, shrublands, and mountainous areas.

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ape, (superfamily Hominoidea), any tailless primate of the families Hylobatidae (gibbons) and Hominidae (chimpanzees, bonobos, orangutans, gorillas, and human beings). Apes are found in the tropical forests of western and central Africa and Southeast Asia. Apes are distinguished from monkeys by the complete absence of a tail and the presence of an appendix and by their more complex brains. Although human beings are categorized zoologically as members of the broader ape superfamily, they are usually placed within their own subcategories on account of their larger brain size, more advanced cognitive abilities (particularly the ability to speak), and striding two-legged gait. Bornean orangutan (Pongo pygmaeus) in a tree Bornean orangutan (Pongo pygmaeus) in a tree Orangutans (Pongo) have demonstrated cognitive abilities such as causal and logical reasoning, self-recognition in mirrors, deception, symbolic communication, foresight, and tool production and use. 漏 guenterguni/iStock.com species of apes species of apes See all media Key People: Robert M. Yerkes Related Topics: Australopithecus gibbon Hominidae great ape lesser ape The gorilla, chimpanzee, bonobo, and orangutan are called great apes in recognition of their comparatively large size and humanlike features; the gibbons are called lesser apes. The great apes are much more intelligent than monkeys and gibbons. Great apes, for example, are able to recognize themselves in mirrors (monkeys and other nonhumans cannot, with the exception of bottlenose dolphins). They can also reason abstractly, learn quasi-linguistic communication, at least when taught by humans, and learn in captivity to make simple tools (though some populations of orangutans and chimpanzees make tools in the wild). The great apes were formerly classified in their own family, Pongidae, but, because of their extremely close relation to humans and the fact that orangutans, gorillas, and chimpanzees are not as closely related to each other as chimpanzees are to humans, all are now grouped with humans in the family Hominidae. Within this family, gorillas, chimpanzees, and humans make up the subfamily Homininae, while orangutans are placed in their own subfamily, Ponginae. Within Homininae, humans are often placed in their own 鈥渢ribe,鈥 Hominini. Also placed in distinct tribes are gorillas (tribe Gorillini) and chimpanzees (tribe Panini). All nonhuman apes have been classified as endangered species. gorilla (Gorilla gorilla) gorilla (Gorilla gorilla) The gorilla (Gorilla gorilla) is the largest of the apes and one of the closest living relatives of humans. Kenneth W. Fink/Root Resources Dromedary camels (Camelus dromedarius). Animals, mammals. BRITANNICA QUIZ Ultimate Animals Quiz Could you lead the tour at your local zoo? Challenge your animal awareness with this quiz. Gibbons (family Hylobatidae) typically move about by swinging (brachiation), and it has been theorized that the ancestors of all apes may once have moved in this way. Nonhuman apes can stand or sit erect with great facility, and occasionally they walk upright, especially when carrying an object. Apes have broad chests, scapulae on the back, and full rotation at the shoulder. There is a pad of cartilage (meniscus) between the ulna and the carpal bones in the wrist that gives the wrist great flexibility. The lumbar section of the spine (lower back) has only four to six vertebrae instead of the seven or more of Old World monkeys. There is no external tail; instead, the remnant three to six vertebrae are fused into the tailbone, or coccyx. gibbons (family Hylobatidae) gibbons (family Hylobatidae) Gibbons differ from great apes in a number of physical ways. Some of the more pronounced differences include having longer arms, dense hair, and a throat sac used for amplifying sound. Edmund Appel/Photo Researchers, Inc. The gibbons and the orangutan are arboreal, while the gorilla, chimpanzee, and bonobo spend some or much of their time on the ground. African apes (gorilla, chimpanzee, and bonobo) travel on the ground by quadrupedal knuckle walking, in which the long fingers of the forelimbs are folded under to provide support for the body. Fruits and other plant material are the chief foods, though small invertebrates are eaten occasionally by all apes, and chimpanzees hunt large vertebrates, especially monkeys. Most apes lodge at night in trees, and all except gibbons build nests for sleeping. Group size ranges from the virtually solitary orangutan to the sociable chimpanzees and bonobos, which may live in bands of 100 or more. Bornean orangutan (Pongo pygmaeus) Bornean orangutan (Pongo pygmaeus) Bornean orangutans (Pongo pygmaeus) inhabit inhabits large portions of the island of Borneo in the Indonesian island chain. 漏 guenterguni/iStock.com Hominidae and Hylobatidae diverged about 18 million years ago, but the evolutionary history of the apes includes numerous extinct forms, many of which are known only from fragmentary remains. The earliest-known hominoids are from Egypt and date from about 36.6 million years ago. Fossil genera include Catopithecus and Aegyptopithecus, possible successive ancestors of both the Old World monkeys and the apes. Later deposits have yielded such fossils as Pliopithecus, once thought to be related to gibbons but now known to be primitive and long separated from them. Closer to the modern apes are Proconsul, Afropithecus, Dryopithecus, and Sivapithecus, the latter being a possible ancestor of the orangutan. human evolution human evolution The divergence of humans and great apes from a common ancestor. Encyclop忙dia Britannica, Inc. Colin Peter Groves Solo man Home Health & Medicine Genetics & Evolution Solo man extinct hominid Alternate titles: Homo erectus soloensis, Javanthropus BY The Editors of Encyclopaedia Britannica | View Edit History Solo man, prehistoric human known from 11 fossil skulls (without facial skeletons) and 2 leg-bone fragments that were recovered from terraces of the Solo River at Ngandong, Java, in 1931鈥32. Cranial capacity (1,150鈥1,300 cubic centimetres) overlaps that of modern man (average 1,350 cu cm). The skulls are flattened in profile, with thick bones and heavy browridges forming a torus, and the limb bones are indistinguishable from those of modern man. Skull bases were broken, indicating that the heads may have been taken as trophies and the brains eaten. Solo man has been thought to date to the Late Pleistocene鈥攑ossibly during the last glaciation (about 15,000 to 20,000 years ago)鈥攂ut his age remains uncertain. Solo man鈥檚 resemblance to Java man and Peking man has led some scholars to consider him a late example of Homo erectus in Asia, H.e. soloensis. Others believe Solo man is a regional variant of widespread early Homo sapiens populations, also including the Neanderthal peoples of Europe and the Rhodesioid peoples of Africa. The Solo fossils were originally given the genus name Javanthropus. Related Topics: Homo sapiens Homo erectus fossil Sivapithecus Home Science Earth Science, Geologic Time & Fossils Fossils & Geologic Time Sivapithecus fossil primate genus BY The Editors of Encyclopaedia Britannica | View Edit History Sivapithecus, fossil primate genus dating from the Miocene Epoch (23.7 to 5.3 million years ago) and thought to be the direct ancestor of the orangutan. Sivapithecus is closely related to Ramapithecus, and fossils of the two primates have often been recovered from the same deposits in the Siw膩lik Hills of northern Pakistan. Other Sivapithecus remains have been found at sites in Turkey, Pakistan, China, Greece, and Kenya. Some authorities maintain that Sivapithecus and Ramapithecus are in fact the same species. Though Sivapithecus was slightly larger than Ramapithecus, it was only a small-to-medium-sized ape about the size of a modern chimpanzee. The fossil remains of Sivapithecus reveal that it shared many of the same specialized facial features of the orangutan鈥攊.e., eyes set narrowly apart, a concave face, a smooth nasal floor, large zygomatic bones, and enlarged central incisors. Related Topics: orangutan fossil Miocene Epoch anthropoid Sivapithecus鈥 place in primate evolution was poorly understood until the 1980s. Prior to this, the genus, along with Ramapithecus, was interpreted as having both apelike and humanlike features and thus was presumed to be a possible first step in the evolutionary divergence of humans from the common hominoid stock of the apes. But new Sivapithecus finds and the reinterpretation of existing remains convinced most authorities in the 1980s that Sivapithecus was the ancestor of the modern orangutan and diverged from the common lineage of the African apes (i.e., chimpanzees and gorillas) and humans more than 13 million years ago. The earliest Sivapithecus remains found so far are about 17 million years old, and the most recent are about 8 million years old.

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ape, (superfamily Hominoidea), any tailless primate of the families Hylobatidae (gibbons) and Hominidae (chimpanzees, bonobos, orangutans, gorillas, and human beings). Apes are found in the tropical forests of western and central Africa and Southeast Asia. Apes are distinguished from monkeys by the complete absence of a tail and the presence of an appendix and by their more complex brains. Although human beings are categorized zoologically as members of the broader ape superfamily, they are usually placed within their own subcategories on account of their larger brain size, more advanced cognitive abilities (particularly the ability to speak), and striding two-legged gait. Bornean orangutan (Pongo pygmaeus) in a tree Bornean orangutan (Pongo pygmaeus) in a tree Orangutans (Pongo) have demonstrated cognitive abilities such as causal and logical reasoning, self-recognition in mirrors, deception, symbolic communication, foresight, and tool production and use. 漏 guenterguni/iStock.com species of apes species of apes See all media Key People: Robert M. Yerkes Related Topics: Australopithecus gibbon Hominidae great ape lesser ape The gorilla, chimpanzee, bonobo, and orangutan are called great apes in recognition of their comparatively large size and humanlike features; the gibbons are called lesser apes. The great apes are much more intelligent than monkeys and gibbons. Great apes, for example, are able to recognize themselves in mirrors (monkeys and other nonhumans cannot, with the exception of bottlenose dolphins). They can also reason abstractly, learn quasi-linguistic communication, at least when taught by humans, and learn in captivity to make simple tools (though some populations of orangutans and chimpanzees make tools in the wild). The great apes were formerly classified in their own family, Pongidae, but, because of their extremely close relation to humans and the fact that orangutans, gorillas, and chimpanzees are not as closely related to each other as chimpanzees are to humans, all are now grouped with humans in the family Hominidae. Within this family, gorillas, chimpanzees, and humans make up the subfamily Homininae, while orangutans are placed in their own subfamily, Ponginae. Within Homininae, humans are often placed in their own 鈥渢ribe,鈥 Hominini. Also placed in distinct tribes are gorillas (tribe Gorillini) and chimpanzees (tribe Panini). All nonhuman apes have been classified as endangered species. gorilla (Gorilla gorilla) gorilla (Gorilla gorilla) The gorilla (Gorilla gorilla) is the largest of the apes and one of the closest living relatives of humans. Kenneth W. Fink/Root Resources Dromedary camels (Camelus dromedarius). Animals, mammals. BRITANNICA QUIZ Ultimate Animals Quiz Could you lead the tour at your local zoo? Challenge your animal awareness with this quiz. Gibbons (family Hylobatidae) typically move about by swinging (brachiation), and it has been theorized that the ancestors of all apes may once have moved in this way. Nonhuman apes can stand or sit erect with great facility, and occasionally they walk upright, especially when carrying an object. Apes have broad chests, scapulae on the back, and full rotation at the shoulder. There is a pad of cartilage (meniscus) between the ulna and the carpal bones in the wrist that gives the wrist great flexibility. The lumbar section of the spine (lower back) has only four to six vertebrae instead of the seven or more of Old World monkeys. There is no external tail; instead, the remnant three to six vertebrae are fused into the tailbone, or coccyx. gibbons (family Hylobatidae) gibbons (family Hylobatidae) Gibbons differ from great apes in a number of physical ways. Some of the more pronounced differences include having longer arms, dense hair, and a throat sac used for amplifying sound. Edmund Appel/Photo Researchers, Inc. The gibbons and the orangutan are arboreal, while the gorilla, chimpanzee, and bonobo spend some or much of their time on the ground. African apes (gorilla, chimpanzee, and bonobo) travel on the ground by quadrupedal knuckle walking, in which the long fingers of the forelimbs are folded under to provide support for the body. Fruits and other plant material are the chief foods, though small invertebrates are eaten occasionally by all apes, and chimpanzees hunt large vertebrates, especially monkeys. Most apes lodge at night in trees, and all except gibbons build nests for sleeping. Group size ranges from the virtually solitary orangutan to the sociable chimpanzees and bonobos, which may live in bands of 100 or more. Bornean orangutan (Pongo pygmaeus) Bornean orangutan (Pongo pygmaeus) Bornean orangutans (Pongo pygmaeus) inhabit inhabits large portions of the island of Borneo in the Indonesian island chain. 漏 guenterguni/iStock.com Hominidae and Hylobatidae diverged about 18 million years ago, but the evolutionary history of the apes includes numerous extinct forms, many of which are known only from fragmentary remains. The earliest-known hominoids are from Egypt and date from about 36.6 million years ago. Fossil genera include Catopithecus and Aegyptopithecus, possible successive ancestors of both the Old World monkeys and the apes. Later deposits have yielded such fossils as Pliopithecus, once thought to be related to gibbons but now known to be primitive and long separated from them. Closer to the modern apes are Proconsul, Afropithecus, Dryopithecus, and Sivapithecus, the latter being a possible ancestor of the orangutan. human evolution human evolution The divergence of humans and great apes from a common ancestor. Encyclop忙dia Britannica, Inc. Colin Peter Groves Solo man Home Health & Medicine Genetics & Evolution Solo man extinct hominid Alternate titles: Homo erectus soloensis, Javanthropus BY The Editors of Encyclopaedia Britannica | View Edit History Solo man, prehistoric human known from 11 fossil skulls (without facial skeletons) and 2 leg-bone fragments that were recovered from terraces of the Solo River at Ngandong, Java, in 1931鈥32. Cranial capacity (1,150鈥1,300 cubic centimetres) overlaps that of modern man (average 1,350 cu cm). The skulls are flattened in profile, with thick bones and heavy browridges forming a torus, and the limb bones are indistinguishable from those of modern man. Skull bases were broken, indicating that the heads may have been taken as trophies and the brains eaten. Solo man has been thought to date to the Late Pleistocene鈥攑ossibly during the last glaciation (about 15,000 to 20,000 years ago)鈥攂ut his age remains uncertain. Solo man鈥檚 resemblance to Java man and Peking man has led some scholars to consider him a late example of Homo erectus in Asia, H.e. soloensis. Others believe Solo man is a regional variant of widespread early Homo sapiens populations, also including the Neanderthal peoples of Europe and the Rhodesioid peoples of Africa. The Solo fossils were originally given the genus name Javanthropus. Related Topics: Homo sapiens Homo erectus fossil Sivapithecus Home Science Earth Science, Geologic Time & Fossils Fossils & Geologic Time Sivapithecus fossil primate genus BY The Editors of Encyclopaedia Britannica | View Edit History Sivapithecus, fossil primate genus dating from the Miocene Epoch (23.7 to 5.3 million years ago) and thought to be the direct ancestor of the orangutan. Sivapithecus is closely related to Ramapithecus, and fossils of the two primates have often been recovered from the same deposits in the Siw膩lik Hills of northern Pakistan. Other Sivapithecus remains have been found at sites in Turkey, Pakistan, China, Greece, and Kenya. Some authorities maintain that Sivapithecus and Ramapithecus are in fact the same species. Though Sivapithecus was slightly larger than Ramapithecus, it was only a small-to-medium-sized ape about the size of a modern chimpanzee. The fossil remains of Sivapithecus reveal that it shared many of the same specialized facial features of the orangutan鈥攊.e., eyes set narrowly apart, a concave face, a smooth nasal floor, large zygomatic bones, and enlarged central incisors. Related Topics: orangutan fossil Miocene Epoch anthropoid Sivapithecus鈥 place in primate evolution was poorly understood until the 1980s. Prior to this, the genus, along with Ramapithecus, was interpreted as having both apelike and humanlike features and thus was presumed to be a possible first step in the evolutionary divergence of humans from the common hominoid stock of the apes. But new Sivapithecus finds and the reinterpretation of existing remains convinced most authorities in the 1980s that Sivapithecus was the ancestor of the modern orangutan and diverged from the common lineage of the African apes (i.e., chimpanzees and gorillas) and humans more than 13 million years ago. The earliest Sivapithecus remains found so far are about 17 million years old, and the most recent are about 8 million years old.

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Today, am gonna tell you all you need to know about the Apes, Welcome to my channel, Animal 馃挅 ape, (superfamily Hominoidea), any tailless primate of the families Hylobatidae (gibbons) and Hominidae (chimpanzees, bonobos, orangutans, gorillas, and human beings). Apes are found in the tropical forests of western and central Africa and Southeast Asia. Apes are distinguished from monkeys by the complete absence of a tail and the presence of an appendix and by their more complex brains. Although human beings are categorized zoologically as members of the broader ape superfamily, they are usually placed within their own subcategories on account of their larger brain size, more advanced cognitive abilities (particularly the ability to speak), and striding two-legged gait. Bornean orangutan (Pongo pygmaeus) in a tree Bornean orangutan (Pongo pygmaeus) in a tree Orangutans (Pongo) have demonstrated cognitive abilities such as causal and logical reasoning, self-recognition in mirrors, deception, symbolic communication, foresight, and tool production and use. 漏 guenterguni/iStock.com species of apes species of apes See all media Key People: Robert M. Yerkes Related Topics: Australopithecus gibbon Hominidae great ape lesser ape The gorilla, chimpanzee, bonobo, and orangutan are called great apes in recognition of their comparatively large size and humanlike features; the gibbons are called lesser apes. The great apes are much more intelligent than monkeys and gibbons. Great apes, for example, are able to recognize themselves in mirrors (monkeys and other nonhumans cannot, with the exception of bottlenose dolphins). They can also reason abstractly, learn quasi-linguistic communication, at least when taught by humans, and learn in captivity to make simple tools (though some populations of orangutans and chimpanzees make tools in the wild). The great apes were formerly classified in their own family, Pongidae, but, because of their extremely close relation to humans and the fact that orangutans, gorillas, and chimpanzees are not as closely related to each other as chimpanzees are to humans, all are now grouped with humans in the family Hominidae. Within this family, gorillas, chimpanzees, and humans make up the subfamily Homininae, while orangutans are placed in their own subfamily, Ponginae. Within Homininae, humans are often placed in their own 鈥渢ribe,鈥 Hominini. Also placed in distinct tribes are gorillas (tribe Gorillini) and chimpanzees (tribe Panini). All nonhuman apes have been classified as endangered species. gorilla (Gorilla gorilla) gorilla (Gorilla gorilla) The gorilla (Gorilla gorilla) is the largest of the apes and one of the closest living relatives of humans. Kenneth W. Fink/Root Resources Dromedary camels (Camelus dromedarius). Animals, mammals. BRITANNICA QUIZ Ultimate Animals Quiz Could you lead the tour at your local zoo? Challenge your animal awareness with this quiz. Gibbons (family Hylobatidae) typically move about by swinging (brachiation), and it has been theorized that the ancestors of all apes may once have moved in this way. Nonhuman apes can stand or sit erect with great facility, and occasionally they walk upright, especially when carrying an object. Apes have broad chests, scapulae on the back, and full rotation at the shoulder. There is a pad of cartilage (meniscus) between the ulna and the carpal bones in the wrist that gives the wrist great flexibility. The lumbar section of the spine (lower back) has only four to six vertebrae instead of the seven or more of Old World monkeys. There is no external tail; instead, the remnant three to six vertebrae are fused into the tailbone, or coccyx. gibbons (family Hylobatidae) gibbons (family Hylobatidae) Gibbons differ from great apes in a number of physical ways. Some of the more pronounced differences include having longer arms, dense hair, and a throat sac used for amplifying sound. Edmund Appel/Photo Researchers, Inc. The gibbons and the orangutan are arboreal, while the gorilla, chimpanzee, and bonobo spend some or much of their time on the ground. African apes (gorilla, chimpanzee, and bonobo) travel on the ground by quadrupedal knuckle walking, in which the long fingers of the forelimbs are folded under to provide support for the body. Fruits and other plant material are the chief foods, though small invertebrates are eaten occasionally by all apes, and chimpanzees hunt large vertebrates, especially monkeys. Most apes lodge at night in trees, and all except gibbons build nests for sleeping. Group size ranges from the virtually solitary orangutan to the sociable chimpanzees and bonobos, which may live in bands of 100 or more. Bornean orangutan (Pongo pygmaeus) Bornean orangutan (Pongo pygmaeus) Bornean orangutans (Pongo pygmaeus) inhabit inhabits large portions of the island of Borneo in the Indonesian island chain. 漏 guenterguni/iStock.com Hominidae and Hylobatidae diverged about 18 million years ago, but the evolutionary history of the apes includes numerous extinct forms, many of which are known only from fragmentary remains. The earliest-known hominoids are from Egypt and date from about 36.6 million years ago. Fossil genera include Catopithecus and Aegyptopithecus, possible successive ancestors of both the Old World monkeys and the apes. Later deposits have yielded such fossils as Pliopithecus, once thought to be related to gibbons but now known to be primitive and long separated from them. Closer to the modern apes are Proconsul, Afropithecus, Dryopithecus, and Sivapithecus, the latter being a possible ancestor of the orangutan. human evolution human evolution The divergence of humans and great apes from a common ancestor. Encyclop忙dia Britannica, Inc. Colin Peter Groves Solo man Home Health & Medicine Genetics & Evolution Solo man extinct hominid Alternate titles: Homo erectus soloensis, Javanthropus BY The Editors of Encyclopaedia Britannica | View Edit History Solo man, prehistoric human known from 11 fossil skulls (without facial skeletons) and 2 leg-bone fragments that were recovered from terraces of the Solo River at Ngandong, Java, in 1931鈥32. Cranial capacity (1,150鈥1,300 cubic centimetres) overlaps that of modern man (average 1,350 cu cm). The skulls are flattened in profile, with thick bones and heavy browridges forming a torus, and the limb bones are indistinguishable from those of modern man. Skull bases were broken, indicating that the heads may have been taken as trophies and the brains eaten. Solo man has been thought to date to the Late Pleistocene鈥攑ossibly during the last glaciation (about 15,000 to 20,000 years ago)鈥攂ut his age remains uncertain. Solo man鈥檚 resemblance to Java man and Peking man has led some scholars to consider him a late example of Homo erectus in Asia, H.e. soloensis. Others believe Solo man is a regional variant of widespread early Homo sapiens populations, also including the Neanderthal peoples of Europe and the Rhodesioid peoples of Africa. The Solo fossils were originally given the genus name Javanthropus. Related Topics: Homo sapiens Homo erectus fossil Sivapithecus Home Science Earth Science, Geologic Time & Fossils Fossils & Geologic Time Sivapithecus fossil primate genus BY The Editors of Encyclopaedia Britannica | View Edit History Sivapithecus, fossil primate genus dating from the Miocene Epoch (23.7 to 5.3 million years ago) and thought to be the direct ancestor of the orangutan. Sivapithecus is closely related to Ramapithecus, and fossils of the two primates have often been recovered from the same deposits in the Siw膩lik Hills of northern Pakistan. Other Sivapithecus remains have been found at sites in Turkey, Pakistan, China, Greece, and Kenya. Some authorities maintain that Sivapithecus and Ramapithecus are in fact the same species. Though Sivapithecus was slightly larger than Ramapithecus, it was only a small-to-medium-sized ape about the size of a modern chimpanzee. The fossil remains of Sivapithecus reveal that it shared many of the same specialized facial features of the orangutan鈥攊.e., eyes set narrowly apart, a concave face, a smooth nasal floor, large zygomatic bones, and enlarged central incisors. Related Topics: orangutan fossil Miocene Epoch anthropoid Sivapithecus鈥 place in primate evolution was poorly understood until the 1980s. Prior to this, the genus, along with Ramapithecus, was interpreted as having both apelike and humanlike features and thus was presumed to be a possible first step in the evolutionary divergence of humans from the common hominoid stock of the apes. But new Sivapithecus finds and the reinterpretation of existing remains convinced most authorities in the 1980s that Sivapithecus was the ancestor of the modern orangutan and diverged from the common lineage of the African apes (i.e., chimpanzees and gorillas) and humans more than 13 million years ago. The earliest Sivapithecus remains found so far are about 17 million years old, and the most recent are about 8 million years old.

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ape, (superfamily Hominoidea), any tailless primate of the families Hylobatidae (gibbons) and Hominidae (chimpanzees, bonobos, orangutans, gorillas, and human beings). Apes are found in the tropical forests of western and central Africa and Southeast Asia. Apes are distinguished from monkeys by the complete absence of a tail and the presence of an appendix and by their more complex brains. Although human beings are categorized zoologically as members of the broader ape superfamily, they are usually placed within their own subcategories on account of their larger brain size, more advanced cognitive abilities (particularly the ability to speak), and striding two-legged gait. Bornean orangutan (Pongo pygmaeus) in a tree Bornean orangutan (Pongo pygmaeus) in a tree Orangutans (Pongo) have demonstrated cognitive abilities such as causal and logical reasoning, self-recognition in mirrors, deception, symbolic communication, foresight, and tool production and use. 漏 guenterguni/iStock.com species of apes species of apes See all media Key People: Robert M. Yerkes Related Topics: Australopithecus gibbon Hominidae great ape lesser ape The gorilla, chimpanzee, bonobo, and orangutan are called great apes in recognition of their comparatively large size and humanlike features; the gibbons are called lesser apes. The great apes are much more intelligent than monkeys and gibbons. Great apes, for example, are able to recognize themselves in mirrors (monkeys and other nonhumans cannot, with the exception of bottlenose dolphins). They can also reason abstractly, learn quasi-linguistic communication, at least when taught by humans, and learn in captivity to make simple tools (though some populations of orangutans and chimpanzees make tools in the wild). The great apes were formerly classified in their own family, Pongidae, but, because of their extremely close relation to humans and the fact that orangutans, gorillas, and chimpanzees are not as closely related to each other as chimpanzees are to humans, all are now grouped with humans in the family Hominidae. Within this family, gorillas, chimpanzees, and humans make up the subfamily Homininae, while orangutans are placed in their own subfamily, Ponginae. Within Homininae, humans are often placed in their own 鈥渢ribe,鈥 Hominini. Also placed in distinct tribes are gorillas (tribe Gorillini) and chimpanzees (tribe Panini). All nonhuman apes have been classified as endangered species. gorilla (Gorilla gorilla) gorilla (Gorilla gorilla) The gorilla (Gorilla gorilla) is the largest of the apes and one of the closest living relatives of humans. Kenneth W. Fink/Root Resources Dromedary camels (Camelus dromedarius). Animals, mammals. BRITANNICA QUIZ Ultimate Animals Quiz Could you lead the tour at your local zoo? Challenge your animal awareness with this quiz. Gibbons (family Hylobatidae) typically move about by swinging (brachiation), and it has been theorized that the ancestors of all apes may once have moved in this way. Nonhuman apes can stand or sit erect with great facility, and occasionally they walk upright, especially when carrying an object. Apes have broad chests, scapulae on the back, and full rotation at the shoulder. There is a pad of cartilage (meniscus) between the ulna and the carpal bones in the wrist that gives the wrist great flexibility. The lumbar section of the spine (lower back) has only four to six vertebrae instead of the seven or more of Old World monkeys. There is no external tail; instead, the remnant three to six vertebrae are fused into the tailbone, or coccyx. gibbons (family Hylobatidae) gibbons (family Hylobatidae) Gibbons differ from great apes in a number of physical ways. Some of the more pronounced differences include having longer arms, dense hair, and a throat sac used for amplifying sound. Edmund Appel/Photo Researchers, Inc. The gibbons and the orangutan are arboreal, while the gorilla, chimpanzee, and bonobo spend some or much of their time on the ground. African apes (gorilla, chimpanzee, and bonobo) travel on the ground by quadrupedal knuckle walking, in which the long fingers of the forelimbs are folded under to provide support for the body. Fruits and other plant material are the chief foods, though small invertebrates are eaten occasionally by all apes, and chimpanzees hunt large vertebrates, especially monkeys. Most apes lodge at night in trees, and all except gibbons build nests for sleeping. Group size ranges from the virtually solitary orangutan to the sociable chimpanzees and bonobos, which may live in bands of 100 or more. Bornean orangutan (Pongo pygmaeus) Bornean orangutan (Pongo pygmaeus) Bornean orangutans (Pongo pygmaeus) inhabit inhabits large portions of the island of Borneo in the Indonesian island chain. 漏 guenterguni/iStock.com Hominidae and Hylobatidae diverged about 18 million years ago, but the evolutionary history of the apes includes numerous extinct forms, many of which are known only from fragmentary remains. The earliest-known hominoids are from Egypt and date from about 36.6 million years ago. Fossil genera include Catopithecus and Aegyptopithecus, possible successive ancestors of both the Old World monkeys and the apes. Later deposits have yielded such fossils as Pliopithecus, once thought to be related to gibbons but now known to be primitive and long separated from them. Closer to the modern apes are Proconsul, Afropithecus, Dryopithecus, and Sivapithecus, the latter being a possible ancestor of the orangutan. human evolution human evolution The divergence of humans and great apes from a common ancestor. Encyclop忙dia Britannica, Inc. Colin Peter Groves Solo man Home Health & Medicine Genetics & Evolution Solo man extinct hominid Alternate titles: Homo erectus soloensis, Javanthropus BY The Editors of Encyclopaedia Britannica | View Edit History Solo man, prehistoric human known from 11 fossil skulls (without facial skeletons) and 2 leg-bone fragments that were recovered from terraces of the Solo River at Ngandong, Java, in 1931鈥32. Cranial capacity (1,150鈥1,300 cubic centimetres) overlaps that of modern man (average 1,350 cu cm). The skulls are flattened in profile, with thick bones and heavy browridges forming a torus, and the limb bones are indistinguishable from those of modern man. Skull bases were broken, indicating that the heads may have been taken as trophies and the brains eaten. Solo man has been thought to date to the Late Pleistocene鈥攑ossibly during the last glaciation (about 15,000 to 20,000 years ago)鈥攂ut his age remains uncertain. Solo man鈥檚 resemblance to Java man and Peking man has led some scholars to consider him a late example of Homo erectus in Asia, H.e. soloensis. Others believe Solo man is a regional variant of widespread early Homo sapiens populations, also including the Neanderthal peoples of Europe and the Rhodesioid peoples of Africa. The Solo fossils were originally given the genus name Javanthropus. Related Topics: Homo sapiens Homo erectus fossil Sivapithecus Home Science Earth Science, Geologic Time & Fossils Fossils & Geologic Time Sivapithecus fossil primate genus BY The Editors of Encyclopaedia Britannica | View Edit History Sivapithecus, fossil primate genus dating from the Miocene Epoch (23.7 to 5.3 million years ago) and thought to be the direct ancestor of the orangutan. Sivapithecus is closely related to Ramapithecus, and fossils of the two primates have often been recovered from the same deposits in the Siw膩lik Hills of northern Pakistan. Other Sivapithecus remains have been found at sites in Turkey, Pakistan, China, Greece, and Kenya. Some authorities maintain that Sivapithecus and Ramapithecus are in fact the same species. Though Sivapithecus was slightly larger than Ramapithecus, it was only a small-to-medium-sized ape about the size of a modern chimpanzee. The fossil remains of Sivapithecus reveal that it shared many of the same specialized facial features of the orangutan鈥攊.e., eyes set narrowly apart, a concave face, a smooth nasal floor, large zygomatic bones, and enlarged central incisors. Related Topics: orangutan fossil Miocene Epoch anthropoid Sivapithecus鈥 place in primate evolution was poorly understood until the 1980s. Prior to this, the genus, along with Ramapithecus, was interpreted as having both apelike and humanlike features and thus was presumed to be a possible first step in the evolutionary divergence of humans from the common hominoid stock of the apes. But new Sivapithecus finds and the reinterpretation of existing remains convinced most authorities in the 1980s that Sivapithecus was the ancestor of the modern orangutan and diverged from the common lineage of the African apes (i.e., chimpanzees and gorillas) and humans more than 13 million years ago. The earliest Sivapithecus remains found so far are about 17 million years old, and the most recent are about 8 million years old.

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ape, (superfamily Hominoidea), any tailless primate of the families Hylobatidae (gibbons) and Hominidae (chimpanzees, bonobos, orangutans, gorillas, and human beings). Apes are found in the tropical forests of western and central Africa and Southeast Asia. Apes are distinguished from monkeys by the complete absence of a tail and the presence of an appendix and by their more complex brains. Although human beings are categorized zoologically as members of the broader ape superfamily, they are usually placed within their own subcategories on account of their larger brain size, more advanced cognitive abilities (particularly the ability to speak), and striding two-legged gait. Bornean orangutan (Pongo pygmaeus) in a tree Bornean orangutan (Pongo pygmaeus) in a tree Orangutans (Pongo) have demonstrated cognitive abilities such as causal and logical reasoning, self-recognition in mirrors, deception, symbolic communication, foresight, and tool production and use. 漏 guenterguni/iStock.com species of apes species of apes See all media Key People: Robert M. Yerkes Related Topics: Australopithecus gibbon Hominidae great ape lesser ape The gorilla, chimpanzee, bonobo, and orangutan are called great apes in recognition of their comparatively large size and humanlike features; the gibbons are called lesser apes. The great apes are much more intelligent than monkeys and gibbons. Great apes, for example, are able to recognize themselves in mirrors (monkeys and other nonhumans cannot, with the exception of bottlenose dolphins). They can also reason abstractly, learn quasi-linguistic communication, at least when taught by humans, and learn in captivity to make simple tools (though some populations of orangutans and chimpanzees make tools in the wild). The great apes were formerly classified in their own family, Pongidae, but, because of their extremely close relation to humans and the fact that orangutans, gorillas, and chimpanzees are not as closely related to each other as chimpanzees are to humans, all are now grouped with humans in the family Hominidae. Within this family, gorillas, chimpanzees, and humans make up the subfamily Homininae, while orangutans are placed in their own subfamily, Ponginae. Within Homininae, humans are often placed in their own 鈥渢ribe,鈥 Hominini. Also placed in distinct tribes are gorillas (tribe Gorillini) and chimpanzees (tribe Panini). All nonhuman apes have been classified as endangered species. gorilla (Gorilla gorilla) gorilla (Gorilla gorilla) The gorilla (Gorilla gorilla) is the largest of the apes and one of the closest living relatives of humans. Kenneth W. Fink/Root Resources Dromedary camels (Camelus dromedarius). Animals, mammals. BRITANNICA QUIZ Ultimate Animals Quiz Could you lead the tour at your local zoo? Challenge your animal awareness with this quiz. Gibbons (family Hylobatidae) typically move about by swinging (brachiation), and it has been theorized that the ancestors of all apes may once have moved in this way. Nonhuman apes can stand or sit erect with great facility, and occasionally they walk upright, especially when carrying an object. Apes have broad chests, scapulae on the back, and full rotation at the shoulder. There is a pad of cartilage (meniscus) between the ulna and the carpal bones in the wrist that gives the wrist great flexibility. The lumbar section of the spine (lower back) has only four to six vertebrae instead of the seven or more of Old World monkeys. There is no external tail; instead, the remnant three to six vertebrae are fused into the tailbone, or coccyx. gibbons (family Hylobatidae) gibbons (family Hylobatidae) Gibbons differ from great apes in a number of physical ways. Some of the more pronounced differences include having longer arms, dense hair, and a throat sac used for amplifying sound. Edmund Appel/Photo Researchers, Inc. The gibbons and the orangutan are arboreal, while the gorilla, chimpanzee, and bonobo spend some or much of their time on the ground. African apes (gorilla, chimpanzee, and bonobo) travel on the ground by quadrupedal knuckle walking, in which the long fingers of the forelimbs are folded under to provide support for the body. Fruits and other plant material are the chief foods, though small invertebrates are eaten occasionally by all apes, and chimpanzees hunt large vertebrates, especially monkeys. Most apes lodge at night in trees, and all except gibbons build nests for sleeping. Group size ranges from the virtually solitary orangutan to the sociable chimpanzees and bonobos, which may live in bands of 100 or more. Bornean orangutan (Pongo pygmaeus) Bornean orangutan (Pongo pygmaeus) Bornean orangutans (Pongo pygmaeus) inhabit inhabits large portions of the island of Borneo in the Indonesian island chain. 漏 guenterguni/iStock.com Hominidae and Hylobatidae diverged about 18 million years ago, but the evolutionary history of the apes includes numerous extinct forms, many of which are known only from fragmentary remains. The earliest-known hominoids are from Egypt and date from about 36.6 million years ago. Fossil genera include Catopithecus and Aegyptopithecus, possible successive ancestors of both the Old World monkeys and the apes. Later deposits have yielded such fossils as Pliopithecus, once thought to be related to gibbons but now known to be primitive and long separated from them. Closer to the modern apes are Proconsul, Afropithecus, Dryopithecus, and Sivapithecus, the latter being a possible ancestor of the orangutan. human evolution human evolution The divergence of humans and great apes from a common ancestor. Encyclop忙dia Britannica, Inc. Colin Peter Groves Solo man Home Health & Medicine Genetics & Evolution Solo man extinct hominid Alternate titles: Homo erectus soloensis, Javanthropus BY The Editors of Encyclopaedia Britannica | View Edit History Solo man, prehistoric human known from 11 fossil skulls (without facial skeletons) and 2 leg-bone fragments that were recovered from terraces of the Solo River at Ngandong, Java, in 1931鈥32. Cranial capacity (1,150鈥1,300 cubic centimetres) overlaps that of modern man (average 1,350 cu cm). The skulls are flattened in profile, with thick bones and heavy browridges forming a torus, and the limb bones are indistinguishable from those of modern man. Skull bases were broken, indicating that the heads may have been taken as trophies and the brains eaten. Solo man has been thought to date to the Late Pleistocene鈥攑ossibly during the last glaciation (about 15,000 to 20,000 years ago)鈥攂ut his age remains uncertain. Solo man鈥檚 resemblance to Java man and Peking man has led some scholars to consider him a late example of Homo erectus in Asia, H.e. soloensis. Others believe Solo man is a regional variant of widespread early Homo sapiens populations, also including the Neanderthal peoples of Europe and the Rhodesioid peoples of Africa. The Solo fossils were originally given the genus name Javanthropus. Related Topics: Homo sapiens Homo erectus fossil Sivapithecus Home Science Earth Science, Geologic Time & Fossils Fossils & Geologic Time Sivapithecus fossil primate genus BY The Editors of Encyclopaedia Britannica | View Edit History Sivapithecus, fossil primate genus dating from the Miocene Epoch (23.7 to 5.3 million years ago) and thought to be the direct ancestor of the orangutan. Sivapithecus is closely related to Ramapithecus, and fossils of the two primates have often been recovered from the same deposits in the Siw膩lik Hills of northern Pakistan. Other Sivapithecus remains have been found at sites in Turkey, Pakistan, China, Greece, and Kenya. Some authorities maintain that Sivapithecus and Ramapithecus are in fact the same species. Though Sivapithecus was slightly larger than Ramapithecus, it was only a small-to-medium-sized ape about the size of a modern chimpanzee. The fossil remains of Sivapithecus reveal that it shared many of the same specialized facial features of the orangutan鈥攊.e., eyes set narrowly apart, a concave face, a smooth nasal floor, large zygomatic bones, and enlarged central incisors. Related Topics: orangutan fossil Miocene Epoch anthropoid Sivapithecus鈥 place in primate evolution was poorly understood until the 1980s. Prior to this, the genus, along with Ramapithecus, was interpreted as having both apelike and humanlike features and thus was presumed to be a possible first step in the evolutionary divergence of humans from the common hominoid stock of the apes. But new Sivapithecus finds and the reinterpretation of existing remains convinced most authorities in the 1980s that Sivapithecus was the ancestor of the modern orangutan and diverged from the common lineage of the African apes (i.e., chimpanzees and gorillas) and humans more than 13 million years ago. The earliest Sivapithecus remains found so far are about 17 million years old, and the most recent are about 8 million years old.

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Today, am gonna tell you all you need to know about the Apes, Welcome to my channel, Animal 馃挅 ape, (superfamily Hominoidea), any tailless primate of the families Hylobatidae (gibbons) and Hominidae (chimpanzees, bonobos, orangutans, gorillas, and human beings). Apes are found in the tropical forests of western and central Africa and Southeast Asia. Apes are distinguished from monkeys by the complete absence of a tail and the presence of an appendix and by their more complex brains. Although human beings are categorized zoologically as members of the broader ape superfamily, they are usually placed within their own subcategories on account of their larger brain size, more advanced cognitive abilities (particularly the ability to speak), and striding two-legged gait. Bornean orangutan (Pongo pygmaeus) in a tree Bornean orangutan (Pongo pygmaeus) in a tree Orangutans (Pongo) have demonstrated cognitive abilities such as causal and logical reasoning, self-recognition in mirrors, deception, symbolic communication, foresight, and tool production and use. 漏 guenterguni/iStock.com species of apes species of apes See all media Key People: Robert M. Yerkes Related Topics: Australopithecus gibbon Hominidae great ape lesser ape The gorilla, chimpanzee, bonobo, and orangutan are called great apes in recognition of their comparatively large size and humanlike features; the gibbons are called lesser apes. The great apes are much more intelligent than monkeys and gibbons. Great apes, for example, are able to recognize themselves in mirrors (monkeys and other nonhumans cannot, with the exception of bottlenose dolphins). They can also reason abstractly, learn quasi-linguistic communication, at least when taught by humans, and learn in captivity to make simple tools (though some populations of orangutans and chimpanzees make tools in the wild). The great apes were formerly classified in their own family, Pongidae, but, because of their extremely close relation to humans and the fact that orangutans, gorillas, and chimpanzees are not as closely related to each other as chimpanzees are to humans, all are now grouped with humans in the family Hominidae. Within this family, gorillas, chimpanzees, and humans make up the subfamily Homininae, while orangutans are placed in their own subfamily, Ponginae. Within Homininae, humans are often placed in their own 鈥渢ribe,鈥 Hominini. Also placed in distinct tribes are gorillas (tribe Gorillini) and chimpanzees (tribe Panini). All nonhuman apes have been classified as endangered species. gorilla (Gorilla gorilla) gorilla (Gorilla gorilla) The gorilla (Gorilla gorilla) is the largest of the apes and one of the closest living relatives of humans. Kenneth W. Fink/Root Resources Dromedary camels (Camelus dromedarius). Animals, mammals. BRITANNICA QUIZ Ultimate Animals Quiz Could you lead the tour at your local zoo? Challenge your animal awareness with this quiz. Gibbons (family Hylobatidae) typically move about by swinging (brachiation), and it has been theorized that the ancestors of all apes may once have moved in this way. Nonhuman apes can stand or sit erect with great facility, and occasionally they walk upright, especially when carrying an object. Apes have broad chests, scapulae on the back, and full rotation at the shoulder. There is a pad of cartilage (meniscus) between the ulna and the carpal bones in the wrist that gives the wrist great flexibility. The lumbar section of the spine (lower back) has only four to six vertebrae instead of the seven or more of Old World monkeys. There is no external tail; instead, the remnant three to six vertebrae are fused into the tailbone, or coccyx. gibbons (family Hylobatidae) gibbons (family Hylobatidae) Gibbons differ from great apes in a number of physical ways. Some of the more pronounced differences include having longer arms, dense hair, and a throat sac used for amplifying sound. Edmund Appel/Photo Researchers, Inc. The gibbons and the orangutan are arboreal, while the gorilla, chimpanzee, and bonobo spend some or much of their time on the ground. African apes (gorilla, chimpanzee, and bonobo) travel on the ground by quadrupedal knuckle walking, in which the long fingers of the forelimbs are folded under to provide support for the body. Fruits and other plant material are the chief foods, though small invertebrates are eaten occasionally by all apes, and chimpanzees hunt large vertebrates, especially monkeys. Most apes lodge at night in trees, and all except gibbons build nests for sleeping. Group size ranges from the virtually solitary orangutan to the sociable chimpanzees and bonobos, which may live in bands of 100 or more. Bornean orangutan (Pongo pygmaeus) Bornean orangutan (Pongo pygmaeus) Bornean orangutans (Pongo pygmaeus) inhabit inhabits large portions of the island of Borneo in the Indonesian island chain. 漏 guenterguni/iStock.com Hominidae and Hylobatidae diverged about 18 million years ago, but the evolutionary history of the apes includes numerous extinct forms, many of which are known only from fragmentary remains. The earliest-known hominoids are from Egypt and date from about 36.6 million years ago. Fossil genera include Catopithecus and Aegyptopithecus, possible successive ancestors of both the Old World monkeys and the apes. Later deposits have yielded such fossils as Pliopithecus, once thought to be related to gibbons but now known to be primitive and long separated from them. Closer to the modern apes are Proconsul, Afropithecus, Dryopithecus, and Sivapithecus, the latter being a possible ancestor of the orangutan. human evolution human evolution The divergence of humans and great apes from a common ancestor. Encyclop忙dia Britannica, Inc. Colin Peter Groves Solo man Home Health & Medicine Genetics & Evolution Solo man extinct hominid Alternate titles: Homo erectus soloensis, Javanthropus BY The Editors of Encyclopaedia Britannica | View Edit History Solo man, prehistoric human known from 11 fossil skulls (without facial skeletons) and 2 leg-bone fragments that were recovered from terraces of the Solo River at Ngandong, Java, in 1931鈥32. Cranial capacity (1,150鈥1,300 cubic centimetres) overlaps that of modern man (average 1,350 cu cm). The skulls are flattened in profile, with thick bones and heavy browridges forming a torus, and the limb bones are indistinguishable from those of modern man. Skull bases were broken, indicating that the heads may have been taken as trophies and the brains eaten. Solo man has been thought to date to the Late Pleistocene鈥攑ossibly during the last glaciation (about 15,000 to 20,000 years ago)鈥攂ut his age remains uncertain. Solo man鈥檚 resemblance to Java man and Peking man has led some scholars to consider him a late example of Homo erectus in Asia, H.e. soloensis. Others believe Solo man is a regional variant of widespread early Homo sapiens populations, also including the Neanderthal peoples of Europe and the Rhodesioid peoples of Africa. The Solo fossils were originally given the genus name Javanthropus. Related Topics: Homo sapiens Homo erectus fossil Sivapithecus Home Science Earth Science, Geologic Time & Fossils Fossils & Geologic Time Sivapithecus fossil primate genus BY The Editors of Encyclopaedia Britannica | View Edit History Sivapithecus, fossil primate genus dating from the Miocene Epoch (23.7 to 5.3 million years ago) and thought to be the direct ancestor of the orangutan. Sivapithecus is closely related to Ramapithecus, and fossils of the two primates have often been recovered from the same deposits in the Siw膩lik Hills of northern Pakistan. Other Sivapithecus remains have been found at sites in Turkey, Pakistan, China, Greece, and Kenya. Some authorities maintain that Sivapithecus and Ramapithecus are in fact the same species. Though Sivapithecus was slightly larger than Ramapithecus, it was only a small-to-medium-sized ape about the size of a modern chimpanzee. The fossil remains of Sivapithecus reveal that it shared many of the same specialized facial features of the orangutan鈥攊.e., eyes set narrowly apart, a concave face, a smooth nasal floor, large zygomatic bones, and enlarged central incisors. Related Topics: orangutan fossil Miocene Epoch anthropoid Sivapithecus鈥 place in primate evolution was poorly understood until the 1980s. Prior to this, the genus, along with Ramapithecus, was interpreted as having both apelike and humanlike features and thus was presumed to be a possible first step in the evolutionary divergence of humans from the common hominoid stock of the apes. But new Sivapithecus finds and the reinterpretation of existing remains convinced most authorities in the 1980s that Sivapithecus was the ancestor of the modern orangutan and diverged from the common lineage of the African apes (i.e., chimpanzees and gorillas) and humans more than 13 million years ago. The earliest Sivapithecus remains found so far are about 17 million years old, and the most recent are about 8 million years old.

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