Photo by amivitale / A group of Rothschild's (Nubian) giraffe were marooned on Longicharo Island, a rocky lava pinnacle in the middle of western Kenya's Lake Baringo. The rising lake levels turned the peninsula into an island, trapping the giraffes. In a dramatic rescue, two were transported across the lake on a makeshift raft, to Ruko Community Conservancy. Today fewer than 3,000 Rothschild's giraffes are left in Africa, with about 800 in Kenya. “The hope is that this is just the first step of reintroducing these giraffes back to their historical home across the Western Rift Valley, hopefully over the next 20-30 years,” explained David O'Connor, president of savegiraffesnow who helped orchestrate this inspiring move with the nrt_kenya and kenyawildlifeservice. Learn more, including how to get involved, by following amivitale and savegiraffesnow.

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