Photo by gerdludwig / In 2011 the Ukrainian government officially legalized tourism in the Chernobyl Exclusion Zone, where visitors can wander through debris-strewn corridors and abandoned classrooms. Hundreds of discarded gas masks litter the floor of the canteen. One tourist brought his own gas mask—not to protect himself but simply to be used in his own photographs. Since the release of the "Chernobyl" miniseries in 2019, the region has become an increasingly popular site for visitors. In the wake of the recent 35th anniversary of the nuclear disaster, Ukrainian cultural minister Oleksandr Tkachenko announced a somewhat unusual proposal: to designate the zone as a UNESCO World Heritage Site. This could bring a projected annual influx of one million visitors—with the option to stay overnight—to a site where signs of hurried abandonment are ubiquitous.

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Photo and video by danwintersphoto / Angelina Jolie has long been involved with the UNHCR as a special envoy, and now she's also working with UNESCO and Guerlain on a Women for Bees initiative that will ultimately build 2,500 bee hives and restock 125 million bees by 2025—while training and supporting 50 women beekeepers. To promote the initiative for World Bee Day, in collaboration with natgeo, Angelina wanted to do a portrait covered in bees. I'm a beekeeper, and when I was given the assignment to work with Angelina, my main concern was safety. Shooting during the pandemic, with a full crew and live bees, made the execution complex. And I knew the only way to ensure we achieved the desired effect for the photo was to use the same technique that Richard Avedon used 40 years ago to create his iconic beekeeper portrait. I hired my friend Konrad Bouffard, a master beekeeper, to help. He contacted the entomologist who formulated a special pheromone (known as queen mandibular pheromone, or QMP) for Avedon and worked with him to capture the image of beekeeper Ronald Fisher, which appeared in his book "The American West." The entomologist offered to let us use the actual pheromone from the Avedon shoot. We used Italian bees, kept calm throughout our shoot by Konrad. Everyone on set, except Angelina, had to be in a protective suit. It had to be quiet and fairly dark to keep the bees calm. I applied the pheromone in the places on her body where I wanted bees to congregate. The bees are attracted to the pheromone, but it also encourages them not to swarm. We also placed a large number of bees on a board that rested in front of her waist. Angelina stood perfectly still, covered in bees for 18 minutes without a sting. Being around bees is always an experience that leaves me in awe. I think this shoot was also an awe-inspiring event for all who were present—and our offering for World Bee Day has its own roots in photographic history. Creating this portrait exactly 40 years later, we are not only honoring bees and beekeepers everywhere today, we are also honoring Avedon, his iconic image, and the technique by which it was achieved. Link in bio for more.

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Photo by maddiemcgarvey / Snow blows off a tree in Sioux County, Nebraska, on a December day. As of the 2010 census, the population was 1,311 in the county, with livestock being one of the largest industries. For more views of rural America, follow me maddiemcgarvey.

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Photo and video by danwintersphoto / Angelina Jolie has long been involved with the UNHCR as a special envoy, and now she's also working with UNESCO and Guerlain on a Women for Bees initiative that will ultimately build 2,500 bee hives and restock 125 million bees by 2025—while training and supporting 50 women beekeepers. To promote the initiative for World Bee Day, in collaboration with natgeo, Angelina wanted to do a portrait covered in bees. I'm a beekeeper, and when I was given the assignment to work with Angelina, my main concern was safety. Shooting during the pandemic, with a full crew and live bees, made the execution complex. And I knew the only way to ensure we achieved the desired effect for the photo was to use the same technique that Richard Avedon used 40 years ago to create his iconic beekeeper portrait. I hired my friend Konrad Bouffard, a master beekeeper, to help. He contacted the entomologist who formulated a special pheromone (known as queen mandibular pheromone, or QMP) for Avedon and worked with him to capture the image of beekeeper Ronald Fisher, which appeared in his book "The American West." The entomologist offered to let us use the actual pheromone from the Avedon shoot. We used Italian bees, kept calm throughout our shoot by Konrad. Everyone on set, except Angelina, had to be in a protective suit. It had to be quiet and fairly dark to keep the bees calm. I applied the pheromone in the places on her body where I wanted bees to congregate. The bees are attracted to the pheromone, but it also encourages them not to swarm. We also placed a large number of bees on a board that rested in front of her waist. Angelina stood perfectly still, covered in bees for 18 minutes without a sting. Being around bees is always an experience that leaves me in awe. I think this shoot was also an awe-inspiring event for all who were present—and our offering for World Bee Day has its own roots in photographic history. Creating this portrait exactly 40 years later, we are not only honoring bees and beekeepers everywhere today, we are also honoring Avedon, his iconic image, and the technique by which it was achieved. Link in bio for more.

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