Rights and Duties: For each moral right there is a corresponding moral duty. • Negative rights create corresponding duties in all other moral agents. • Positive rights create corresponding duties in specific individuals. • Special rights create corresponding duties in individuals identified by examining the actions or relationships that create the right. Possession Criteria: • For each moral right there is a “checklist” of characteristics an individual must have in order to possess that right. The items on this list are the possession criteria for that right. An individual has a moral right only if it meets these criteria. • Possession criteria must be morally relevant to the nature and content of the right. o Possession criteria for natural rights are always natural characteristics of the individual (e.g., rationality, sentience). o Possession criteria for special rights always have to do with actions or relationships (e.g., parent-child relationship, act of making a promise). o Possession criteria for negative rights are generally factors that enable one to be autonomous (i.e., self-governing); e.g., rationality, experience of the world. o Possession criteria for positive rights are generally one’s vulnerability to harm. The Right to Life: This right does not fit cleanly into any of the above categories. It would be better to describe this as a set of related moral rights. Human Rights: There does not seem to be any way of establishing suitable possession criteria for human rights. It would be irrelevant and unjust to use a biological category (e.g., being human), and other characteristics (e.g., being rational) do not apply to all and only human beings. Thus, it seems that there are no genuinely human rights. Rights in Conflict: • A moral issue cannot be settled by pointing out just one of the rights involved. Rights conflict with one another, and we must determine which rights override which other ones. • Immunity rights often override liberty rights, although there are exceptions (e.g., harming another in self-defense). • Each moral right is either absolute or defeasible: • Absolute: Automatically overrides any other right with which it conflicts. • Defeasible: May be overridden by other moral rights. • An action that conflicts with a moral right is not automatically morally impermissible. It could be that the right with which it conflicts is overridden in this situation by some other right. • Violating a right: An action violates a right when it conflicts with that right and that right has not been overridden by other rights in that situation. Such actions are morally impermissible. • Infringing upon a right: An action infringes upon a right when it conflicts with a right and that right has been overridden by other rights in that situation. Such actions are morally permissible. Questions to Ask about Moral Rights: 1. Which rights are there? 2. Who has the corresponding duties? 3. How should we resolve conflicts among rights? 4. Do rights admit of degree? 5. What are the possession criteria for each right?
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More from Pray for Peace. War is evil. War is crazy. Pray for Peace. No war with Iran.

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Nurse, Fired for Refusing COVID-19 Shot, Slams Mandate Chris Woodward, Billy Davis (OneNewsNow.com) Today is job termination day for Texas registered nurse Jennifer Bridges and many others who refused to get the COVID-19 shot, and the nurse insists she has no regrets for refusing to get the Johnson and Johnson shot in order to keep her job. COVID vaccine shot 2Today is job termination day for Texas registered nurse Jennifer Bridges and many others who refused to get the COVID-19 shot, and the nurse insists she has no regrets for refusing to get the Johnson and Johnson shot in order to keep her job. Jennifer Bridges was among hundreds of employees at Houston Methodist Hospital who faced a hard decision: Get the COVID-19 vaccine by June 7 or face unpaid suspension, then get fired if you still refuse after going two weeks without a paycheck. “So we get fired,” she tells One News Now, “for not being comfortable with taking the COVID vaccine." All totaled, 178 employees out of 26,000 on the hospital payroll were suspended in June, and 117 joined a now-tossed federal lawsuit to fight the hospital’s requirement. An appeal is likely after a judge dismissed the suit. According to a USA Today story, which credits Bridges for leading the hospital’s anti-vaccine fight, approximately 85% of employees complied with CEO Dr. Marc Bloom’s requirement of a COVID-19 shot. Bloom first wooed Houston Methodist employees with a $500 “hope bonus” that expired in March. By April, however, employees were informed their jobs were on the line if they refused, the story says. Bridges, who contacted One News Now to share her personal story, says it’s wrong to require people to get jabbed by a vaccine approved for emergency use. “No one should force that upon somebody you know,” she says, “and then lose your job if you don't get it.” One News Now reported in a June 2 story that Louisiana’s attorney general warned Louisiana State the university can’t legally demand vaccinations from faculty, staff, and students. That is because Emergency Use Authorization by the FDA stipulates the legal right to refuse it. The state’s attorney general, Jeff Landry, cited the federal code in a letter to university officials, who reviewed the law and backed off. In the lawsuit brought by employees, Judge Lynn Hughes claimed the federal laws does not apply to private employers and said the holdout employees at Houston Methodist are not victims of "coercion" and will "need to find work somewhere else," USA Today reported. Two other federal agencies, the U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission, and the Occupational Safety and Health Administration, both claim it is legal for employers to require a vaccination, the story said. Bridges also insists the COVID-19 shot is “experimental phase,” a claim that Houston Methodist also disputes. Bridges told USA Today for its story that she gets the flu vaccine every year as required by her now-former employer, where she had worked for six years. She drew the line at the hurried vaccine, she said, especially after she contracted the virus earlier this year. A second registered nurse at Houston Methodist, Kathy Toft, told USA Today she quit rather than get the shot. She, too, came down with the virus last year. "I’m not refusing this vaccine to be rebellious in any way,” Toft told the newspaper. “I’m refusing the vaccine because I’m genuinely worried about the reactions or even long-term effects of this vaccine.”
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More from Pray for Peace. War is evil. War is crazy. Pray for Peace. No war with Iran.

honey cancel our plans for hallowe

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