Photo by jimrichardsonng // Sponsored by IndigoAg // Piloting her 16-row combine with GPS-guided precision, farmer Annie Dee brought in her 2019 corn harvest when I visited her Alabama farm last month. Mankind’s autumn harvest rituals have become huge technological spectacles as we struggle to feed our burgeoning world population. Just as important—but harder to see—is what Annie is doing with her soil: She’s using no-till agriculture. By reducing tillage (not plowing and leaving crop residue in place), she can actually help in capturing carbon from the atmosphere and sequestering it in the soil. For a long time, world agriculture has been depleting soil carbon and releasing it into the atmosphere. Reversing that trend, especially on large-scale farms like Annie’s, could be a big win all around. // IndigoAg is unlocking agriculture’s potential to help reverse climate change. That’s the vision behind the Terraton Initiative, a global movement with the goal of using regenerative farming practices to take one trillion tons of carbon dioxide from the atmosphere. Follow Terraton to see the progress.

6Upvotes
thumb_upthumb_downchat_bubble

More from National Geographic

Photo by Jimmy Chin jimmychin | Yosemite National Park: A rare bird’s-eye view of El Capitan and Half Dome. For more images of wild landscapes around the world, follow jimmychin

94 views · May 28th

Photo by Brian Skerry brianskerry | A pair of Atlantic bluefin tuna, each weighing perhaps 1,000 pounds, swim in the chilly waters of Canada's Gulf of St. Lawrence. Bluefin possess incredible biology. They continue to grow their entire lives, swim faster than torpedoes, crisscross the ocean each year, and generate heat in their bodies, allowing them to swim into cold waters to feed. Revered for centuries, their stocks have now dwindled. Follow BrianSkerry to see more wildlife in the sea and to read the stories behind the photos.

31 views · May 28th

Photo by Dina Litovsky dina_litovsky | Students in Kiev celebrate the last day of school by jumping into the city’s numerous fountains. The "last bell" ceremony dates to the Soviet Union era and is still observed in many post-Soviet cities. The festivities begin just after classes finish but before the final exams. For a couple of days, Kiev turns into a playground for students celebrating the beginning of summer. For more images, follow me dina_litovsky.

31 views · May 28th

More from National Geographic

Photo by Jimmy Chin jimmychin | Yosemite National Park: A rare bird’s-eye view of El Capitan and Half Dome. For more images of wild landscapes around the world, follow jimmychin

94 views · May 28th

Photo by Brian Skerry brianskerry | A pair of Atlantic bluefin tuna, each weighing perhaps 1,000 pounds, swim in the chilly waters of Canada's Gulf of St. Lawrence. Bluefin possess incredible biology. They continue to grow their entire lives, swim faster than torpedoes, crisscross the ocean each year, and generate heat in their bodies, allowing them to swim into cold waters to feed. Revered for centuries, their stocks have now dwindled. Follow BrianSkerry to see more wildlife in the sea and to read the stories behind the photos.

31 views · May 28th

Photo by Dina Litovsky dina_litovsky | Students in Kiev celebrate the last day of school by jumping into the city’s numerous fountains. The "last bell" ceremony dates to the Soviet Union era and is still observed in many post-Soviet cities. The festivities begin just after classes finish but before the final exams. For a couple of days, Kiev turns into a playground for students celebrating the beginning of summer. For more images, follow me dina_litovsky.

31 views · May 28th