NEBRASKA (KMTV) — The President of the Nebraska Farm Bureau recently sent President Biden a letter, asking for clarity on his 30x30 climate executive order. "Farming seems mighty easy when your plow is a pencil, and the nearest cornfield is over a thousand miles away," said farmer Gage Hoegermeyer. "The concerns the Nebraska Farm Bureau has with President Biden's executive order on setting aside 30 percent of our land and water for conservation, is that we really don't know what he means by set aside or put it into conservation. So we're asking for clarification from the administration," said Mark McHargue, President of the Nebraska Farm Bureau. In the letter sent to President Biden, McHargue expresses his frustration with the communication the Ag industry has received from the White House so far. The letter reads in part, "Given the lack of detail in the executive order itself, as well as interior secretary Haaland's inability or unwillingness to answer questions about the executive order during her confirmation hearing, more information on the executive order and its goals are desperately needed before any action by the administration be taken." "At this point, we have not received any correspondence from our letter, and correspondence from our members asking the same question," said McHargue. So what could this executive order mean for farmers? "Take it to the extreme would be the federal government coming in and acquiring private property and asking us or telling us that we have to do certain conservation practices on our property that we own or the water. So that's the top of the concern, that there would be a gross government overreach into private property rights," said McHargue. And how could this impact us? "If we were to take away one-third of the grazing land in this state, beef would become very hard to find. If we were to take on third of our row crop land out, the prices of commodities would be so high," said Hoegermeyer. Farmers have different conservation efforts in place so that their crops and livestock can flourish, such as windbreaks, terraces to keep water and soil from rolling down the hill, and cover crops to put nutrients back into the land, just to name a few. "When it comes to agriculture in the Midwest is that during the summer in the peak of corn production, we produce 40 percent more oxygen than the Amazon rain forest," said Hoegermeyer. Farmers and ranchers in Nebraska urge the Biden administration to come visit these farms and ranches to see firsthand the conservation practices being used day in and day out and allow them to have a seat at the table when talking about executive orders related to agriculture. Those with concerns about the plan could have more answers soon. Biden has asked the secretaries of the interior, agriculture, and commerce to submit a plan for executing the 30x30 by the end of this month.

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