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Very very interesting item. There was a French play about Oscar Wilde which Alfred Douglas (one of Wilde's Lovers) took such a disliking to he worked with Les and Sewell Stokes to write more accurate version titled 'Oscar Wilde' This hardback copy of the play is signed to 'Buck' (The actor who played Wilde) by Sewel and Les Stoke as well as Alfred Douglas. The producers and actor who plays Douglas also signed this on the following dedication page. Books are such an amazing gateway to the personal lives of people, including historic figures. Every day provides another bridge to the past. I'll never tire of this profession.

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More from GordonofKhartoum

Every now and then you find wee treasures in old books. In the Weimar Republic in the inter war period hyperinflation made it so that a loaf of bread worth 160 Deutschmarks in 1922 cost 200,000,000,000 Marks by late 1923. This is a 100,000 Deutschmark note from 1923. Many Germans would carry wheelbarrows full of these to go buy a loaf of bread or they would simply burn them for heat. Crazy to think this note was one of the factors that lead to the second world war.

178 views · Apr 5th

Signed by the #IronLady herself

45 views · Mar 27th

The Man, The Myth, The Legend. He entered the service of the Khedive of Egypt in 1873 (with British government approval) and later became the Governor-General of the Sudan, where he did much to suppress revolts and the local slave trade. Exhausted, he resigned and returned to Europe in 1880. A serious revolt then broke out in the Sudan, led by a Muslim religious leader and self-proclaimed Mahdi, Muhammad Ahmad. In early 1884 Gordon was sent to Khartoum with instructions to secure the evacuation of loyal soldiers and civilians and to depart with them. In defiance of those instructions, after evacuating about 2,500 civilians he retained a smaller group of soldiers and non-military men. In the months before the fall of Khartoum, Gordon and the Mahdi corresponded; Gordon offered him the Sultanate of Kordofan and the Mahdi requested Gordon to convert to his religion and join him, to which Gordon replied abruptly: "No!" Besieged by the Mahdi's forces, Gordon organised a citywide defence that lasted for almost a year and gained him the admiration of the British public, but not of the government, which had wished him not to become entrenched. Only when public pressure to act had become irresistible did the government, with reluctance, send a relief force. It arrived two days after the city had fallen and Gordon had been killed.

41 views · Mar 14th

More from GordonofKhartoum

Every now and then you find wee treasures in old books. In the Weimar Republic in the inter war period hyperinflation made it so that a loaf of bread worth 160 Deutschmarks in 1922 cost 200,000,000,000 Marks by late 1923. This is a 100,000 Deutschmark note from 1923. Many Germans would carry wheelbarrows full of these to go buy a loaf of bread or they would simply burn them for heat. Crazy to think this note was one of the factors that lead to the second world war.

178 views · Apr 5th

Signed by the #IronLady herself

45 views · Mar 27th

The Man, The Myth, The Legend. He entered the service of the Khedive of Egypt in 1873 (with British government approval) and later became the Governor-General of the Sudan, where he did much to suppress revolts and the local slave trade. Exhausted, he resigned and returned to Europe in 1880. A serious revolt then broke out in the Sudan, led by a Muslim religious leader and self-proclaimed Mahdi, Muhammad Ahmad. In early 1884 Gordon was sent to Khartoum with instructions to secure the evacuation of loyal soldiers and civilians and to depart with them. In defiance of those instructions, after evacuating about 2,500 civilians he retained a smaller group of soldiers and non-military men. In the months before the fall of Khartoum, Gordon and the Mahdi corresponded; Gordon offered him the Sultanate of Kordofan and the Mahdi requested Gordon to convert to his religion and join him, to which Gordon replied abruptly: "No!" Besieged by the Mahdi's forces, Gordon organised a citywide defence that lasted for almost a year and gained him the admiration of the British public, but not of the government, which had wished him not to become entrenched. Only when public pressure to act had become irresistible did the government, with reluctance, send a relief force. It arrived two days after the city had fallen and Gordon had been killed.

41 views · Mar 14th