Photo by Michaela Skovranova mishkusk | Many residents of Nymboida, a rural village in the Northern Rivers region of New South Wales, Australia, lost most of their possessions in a devastating bushfire that swept through the area on November 8. Over a month later, bushfires continue to ignite in already burned through areas. More than one million hectares have burned across New South Wales during this bushfire season, with conditions predicted to worsen as Australia heads into summer. Despite the devastation, it has been heartwarming to see the community come together and support each other. The emotional drain of the bushfires must be unfathomable. If this is any indication of what’s to come, we all need to help each other in whatever way we can.

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