Sad Truth: Vaccines are very dangerous completely unncessary toxin they force into our bodies. See the real story from the 1st vaccine:

https://youtu.be/cLrqmvjrIjI?list=PLgH2vCx5TOgX5upobA1NO--PyE60CLlVa http://www.dissolvingillusions.com/critiques/ ______________________ Author’s Introduction – Roman Bystrianyk My journey began many years ago with the birth of my children. I always wanted to make sure they had the best I could provide: healthy food, a secure place to live, lots of toys, and plenty of caring, laughing, and love. When it came time to have them vaccinated I had assumed, like most parents, that it was a good idea. It had to be—governments, medical professionals, and just about everyone agreed that vaccines were one of the greatest medical discoveries of all time. Measles, whooping cough, smallpox, and all sorts of other horrible infectious diseases were nowhere to be seen, thanks to vaccines. I’m by nature an inquisitive and questioning person, and something didn’t sit right with me about vaccination. A nagging inner voice kept telling me that I should know more about these injections going into my family. Somehow I knew I shouldn’t completely and blindly accept that vaccines were safe and effective. At this point, I knew almost nothing about vaccines, but as I began to do some reading I found some disturbing bits of information that built upon my base-line apprehension. But because of the amount of pressure from doctors and my wife at the time, my children had received some vaccines. In the past, I felt enormously guilty after agreeing to allow my sons to be injected, and I hoped no terrible side effects would occur. I remember staying up at night, feeling distraught after agreeing to give them an injection and hoping nothing major would happen to them. I was overwhelmed with worry, wondering if I had done the right thing by succumbing to the pressure to have them vaccinated. Nothing overt appeared to happen, and they seemed to emerge basically unscathed. Despite being told that vaccines were harmless, I was still left with a feeling that maybe I had done the wrong thing. I started keeping files with the information I was finding in an attempt to make sense of it all. Eventually, I ran across a book by Neil Z. Miller. In it, Miller showed a graph of deaths from measles that had declined by 95 percent before the measles vaccine was put into general use. I couldn’t believe it! Wasn’t the decline of deaths from disease the claim to fame for vaccines? Wasn’t this the main reason for vaccinating? Could this graph be correct? That graph left me with an irksome, yet simple, question: Were vaccines really responsible for the decline in mortality from infectious diseases and the eradication of certain diseases? It was important to me to remain objective. My goal was to get to the truth. It seemed that this obvious question should be easy to answer. After all, vaccines have been around for more than one hundred years. Surely the CDC or some medical organization would have a large database of mortality and disease rates available. I was amazed that this wasn’t the case. Data that I sought wasn’t that easy to find. I thought it was strange that the data wasn’t on public display for the world to see, especially if vaccines had defeated the deadly infectious diseases of the past. Where was the proof? I continued to research vaccination and spent countless hours at the Yale Medical Library as well as other research libraries. I located some mortality data and started gathering statistics from different sources and entered it all into a computer spreadsheet program. Few medical journals referenced historic mortality data, and those that did made no mention of something that now became clear to me. Looking at the data from the United States starting from 1900, the measles mortality rate had declined by more than 98 percent before the introduction of the vaccine! Even more shocking was that the same data revealed that whooping cough mortality had declined by more than 90 percent before the DTP vaccine was introduced! I was stunned that no one I knew, including my sons’ doctors, had carefully examined this fundamental belief that vaccines were responsible for the massive decline in deaths from measles and whooping cough. I now realized that the belief that vaccines were essential in eliminating the threat of at least these two diseases was based on a myth. There must have been other factors that led to such a dramatic decline in mortality before vaccine introduction. I presented a great deal of information to the mother of my children. Even though she was an educated nurse, she found it impossible to accept what I showed her. On a weekend not long after, I noticed that all three of my children were very sick. I examined them more closely and saw that they all had high fevers and extremely red eyes. I couldn’t imagine why they were all so sick. I called their mother and found out that they had, without my knowledge or consent, gotten the DTP, MMR, and polio shots all in one visit. A rush of emotions swept over me. I was angry, upset, worried, and devastated. One of the most important health decisions involving my children had been stripped away from me. The children were very ill all weekend. One of my boys kept having sporadic shooting pains in one eye that recurred intermittently for a couple of months and ultimately seemed to resolve. By this time, I had accumulated a vast amount of information and hard data. It seemed more likely that we had been misled to believe that vaccination was responsible for eliminating the notorious diseases and devastation of the past. I wondered how statistics and information from medical journals were completely disregarded. That brought me to an understanding of how easily people can be ensnared in a faulty belief system. Assurances from medical authorities that, out of love and responsibility, parents should vaccinate their children were all most people needed to hear. I gained clarity that there was an underlying societal belief in vaccines that was not based on history or evidence. That belief is maintained by a public that remains foundationally subservient and obedient to governmental and medical hierarchies that may not deserve their trust. Several years after my children had that vaccine reaction, one of them collapsed. Subsequent EEG (electroencephalogram) tracings reflected abnormal brain waves consistent with seizures. From my research, I couldn’t help but suspect that the vaccines had caused neurological damage. The neurologist told me that nothing nutritionally could be done to help with the seizures. Unwilling to accept this, I did my own research and found studies in medical journals that showed certain nutrients could make a significant difference. I put my son on a protocol of omega-3 fatty acids, B-complex, magnesium, and other nutrients and an organic diet. Happily, after a few months, the EEG revealed no seizure activity! Not only was I thrilled that my son’s condition had improved, but the experience had again shown me the power of belief systems. In this case, the belief that nutrients and diet had no effect on brain health was absolutely wrong. Conventional medical journals contained the information on using nutrients to stop seizures, but shockingly, the information just was not being used by the medical profession. Each one of these experiences propelled me to continue my research. I obtained data from many sources that led me to solidify and round out my hypothesis that vaccines were not responsible for the decline in deaths from infectious diseases. Now I was left with new ques-tions. What did cause the decline of infectious diseases? Why was there such a rock-solid belief that vaccines were responsible? What was the true history? I continued to pour through hundreds of medical journals and long-overlooked books, magazines, and newspapers from the 1800s and early 1900s. I found thousands of pages that painted a new picture. I was astonished that an amazing and exciting history had all been tossed in the basements of libraries and possibly lost forever. This new information revealed to me a radically different view of life in the 1800s. I also discovered how science can go horribly wrong. We can easily become captured by a belief system that is built on a shaky and flawed foundation. How often do we believe in something, not because we have done in-depth research on it, but because authority figures tell us it is the truth? What if what we believe is just an illusion? I hope that you find the information in this book—graphs, quote-filled chapters, and more—an interesting addition to what you believe. I think the pages of each chapter will provide a unique insight and shine a different light on what really is a hidden past. For some of you, this might be a starting point to begin questioning what you may have innocently accepted as the truth. For others, the information might fill in large gaps and answer questions you may have had but never knew where to look. For me, it has been a rewarding process of dissolving illusions that I’d like to share with you. ____________________________________________ Chapter 1 The Not So Good Ol’ Days. As we passed along the reeking banks of the sewer the sun shone upon a narrow slip of the water. In the bright light it appeared the colour of strong green tea, and positively looked as solid as black marble in the shadow—indeed it was more like watery mud than muddy water; and yet we were assured this was the only water the wretched inhabitants had to drink. As we gazed in horror at it, we saw drains and sewers emptying their filthy contents into it; we saw a whole tier of doorless privies in the open road, common to men and women, built over it; we heard bucket after bucket of filth splash into it . . . – Henry Mayhew (1812-1887), September 24, 1849 Passing along a rough bank, among stakes and washing lines, one penetrates into this chaos of small one-storied, one-roomed huts, in most of which there is no artificial floor; kitchen, living, and sleeping-room all in one . . . Everywhere before the doors residue and offal [waste]; that any sort of pavement lay underneath could not be seen but only felt, here and there, with the feet. – Friedrich Engels (1820-1895), 1844 Many of us have a picture of the 1800s colored by a myriad of filters that impart a nostalgic and romantic view of that era. You may picture a time when gentleman callers arrived to meet a well-dressed lady in a finely furnished parlor. A time where people leisurely drifted down a river on a paddlewheel riverboat while sip-ping mint juleps. A time of more elegant travel aboard a steam train passing through the beautiful countryside, or a stylish woman dressed in a long, flowing gown, descending from a sleek horse-drawn carriage with the aid of a dapper companion in a top hat. You may think of those times where life was simple and ordered—a seeming utopia, free of the many woes that plague modern society. But if those filters are removed and a more objective light is cast upon that time, a different picture emerges. Instead, imagine a world where workplaces had no health, safety, or minimum-wage laws. The 1800s was a century when people put in 12 to 16 hours a day at the most tedious menial labor. Imagine bands of children roaming the streets out of control because their parents were laboring long days. Children were also involved in dangerous and demoralizing work. Picture the city of New York surrounded not by suburbs but by rings of smoldering garbage dumps and shantytowns. Cities where hogs, horses, and dogs and their refuse were commonplace in the streets. Many infectious diseases were rampant throughout the world, particularly in the larger cities. This is not a description of the Third World, but a large portion of what the United States and other civilized Western countries used to be only a century or so ago. Chapter 2 Suffer the Little Children I have been working below three years on my father’s account: he takes me down at two in the morning, and I am up at two the next afternoon. I go to bed at six at night, to be ready for work the next morning. I have to bear my burthen [burden] four traps or ladders before I get to the main road, which leads to the pit bottom. My task is four or five tubs; each tub holds 4 ½ cwt [1 cwt. or hundredweight = 112 pounds]. I fill five tubs in twenty journeys. Am very glad when my task is wrought, as it sore fatigues. – Ellison Jack, 11-year-old girl, coal bearer, 1840s But the young, young children, O my brothers! They are weeping bitterly. They are weeping in the play-time of the others In the country of the free. “For oh!” say the children, “we are weary, And we cannot run or leap. If we cared for any meadows, it were merely To drop in them and sleep.” They look up with their pale and sunken faces, And their look is dread to see. – Elizabeth Barrett Browning (1806–1861), “Cry of the Children,” 1842 In the Western world, many children enjoy what we have come to define as a normal childhood. They generally get up in the morning and have a reasonable breakfast, and then, during the majority of the year, attend school. In public and private schools, they are educated in math, science, languages, and other areas of study. While in school, they are fed, and all their basic needs are usually met. They often have a chance to experience art, music, and physical education and to play games at recess. During the balance of the day, they may interact with their friends, play games, enjoy sports, watch television, play with their pets, or engage in an entire host of other leisure activities. At night they sleep in a relatively safe environment. In the summer months, they often enjoy long, leisurely days playing and may even take vacations with their family. Although this life is not enjoyed by all and may not be perfect, it is far more common in the developed world than it used to be. During the 1800s and into the 1900s, life for many children in the United States and England was that of long and brutal hours of hard labor and poverty. Their lives were not filled with joy and laughter, but often with suffering and crushing misery. Belief and Fear The one permanent emotion of the inferior man is fear—fear of the unknown, the complex, the inexplicable. What he wants above everything else is safety. – Henry Louis Mencken (1880–1956) Figures often beguile me, particularly when I have the arranging of them myself; in which case the remark attributed to Disraeli would often apply with justice and force: “There are three kinds of lies: lies, damned lies and statistics.” – Mark Twain (1835–1910) Not a scintilla of truth as to the benefit of vaccination or of anti-diphtheritic serum, is in existence, except statistics. And statistics are lies. Two kinds of lies. Deliberate lies and stupid lies. I have spent too much time behind the scenes where medical statistics are made to have a particle of faith in them. – F. N. Seitz, Mechano-Therapy Specialist, 1908 The great enemy of the truth is very often not the lie—deliberate, contrived and dishonest, but the myth, persistent, persuasive, and unrealistic. Belief in myths allows the comfort of opinion without the discomfort of thought. – John Fitzgerald Kennedy (1917–1963) Belief and fear are powerful influences to the psyche. Because hierarchical powers have exploited these human vulnerabilities, they have unfortunately shaped the world. People are led to believe that because the world is a dangerous place, only governments and large institutions can provide protection because they are bigger and more knowledgeable than small communities. Rules and restrictions are put in place. Those who believe this lose trust in their own capability and thus surrender thinking and decision making to others. Chapter 3 Disease – A Way of Life Like beasts, like maniacs, the people fell on them . . . There is no more dreadful sight than such popular anger thirsting for blood and throttling its defenseless victims . . . In the Rue Vaugirard, where two men were killed . . . I saw one of these unfortunates when he was still breathing and the old hags were just pulling the wooden shoes from their feet and beating him on the head with them till he was dead. He was quite naked and bloody and mashed; they had torn off not only his clothes but his hair, his sex, and his nose, and one ruffian tied a rope to the feet of the corpse and dragging it through the streets, shouting constantly, “Voilà le Cholera-morbus!” – Heinrich Hein (1797–1856), 1832 Paris cholera epidemic . . . the cupidity [extreme greed] of landlords had tempted them to build up narrow alleys with small wooden tenements, which, costing but little, and being let to numerous families, yield immense profits. The alley is often not more than six feet wide, paved with round stones and with very insufficient means for draining off the water. It is not uncommon in such situations to find one or two apartments in each house entirely under ground. Can we wonder if in such a state of things we find moral as well as physical disease, vice as well as sickness? Can we expect men who live thus to be sober and orderly, or women to be cleanly and domestic? In such situations, during the summer months, diarrhoea and dysentery are rife, and among children fatal. – New York physician Benjamin McCready (1813–1892), 1837 Infectious diseases were a constant terror during the 1800s. With increasingly dense populations, wars, and abject poverty, diseases of all varieties exacted a horrendous toll. The poverty-stricken masses carried the brunt of the relentless assaults of these diseases, yet no class was spared. Periodic epidemics and pandemics swept across the globe, wreaking havoc and killing millions, rivaling the horrors of war. Abysmal sanitation, hygiene, nutrition, and working and living conditions, combined with a sense of utter hopelessness, laid the foundation for the devastation. Sanitation was not a new concept. In the time of the Old Testament, there were clear-cut biblical rules laid out governing the management and disposal of dangerous human waste and rubbish outside the cities and away from water sources. Greece and Rome also perfected well-regulated public health systems. During the Dark Ages, these ideas simply dropped out of the collective memory in many areas of the world. Chapter 4 Smallpox and the First Vaccine . . . they lye on their hard matts, the poxe breaking and mattering, and running one into another, their skin cleaving to the matts they lye on; they turne them, a whole side will flea off at once. – William Bradford (1590–1657), 1634 . . . Fresh vesicles subsequently formed around the vaccination pocks coalescing with them and causing them to spread. They developed also on the face, head, body, and in the mouth, the later prevented the child from suckling, and it died exhausted on the 45th day after vaccination. – Case of a healthy child after vaccination, March 13, 1891 Try re-vaccination—It never will hurt you, For re-vaccination has this one great virtue: Should it injure or kill you whenever you receive it, We all stand prepared to refuse to believe it. – From a circular signed “The Doctors,” 1876 Human smallpox, also known as Orthopox variola, was a notorious infectious viral entity that served up a febrile illness and painful, oozing skin lesions (pox) to its victims. The disease not only disfigured but often led to death. The most deadly feature of the new towns was the close proximity of human beings to each other. For example, the report of a health officer for Darlington in the 1850s found six children, aged between 2 and 17, suffering from smallpox in a one-roomed dwelling shared with their parents, and elder brother and an uncle. They all slept together on rags on the floor, with no bed. Millions of similar cases could be cited, with conditions getting even worse as disease victims died and their corpses remained rotting among families in single-roomed accommodations for days, as the family scraped together the pennies to bury them. Chapter 5 Contaminated Vaccines Consequences are unpitying. – George Elliot (1819–1880) The fact that man knows right from wrong proves his intellectual superiority to the other creatures; but the fact that he can do wrong proves his moral inferiority to any creatures that cannot. – Mark Twain (1835–1910) Smallpox vaccines have always been an unknown broth of hundreds of thousands of non-cowpox microbes. The purity was not guaranteed even when smallpox vaccines were advertised as “pure lymph.” Dr. Bayly discusses the terminology: Presumably it is called “pure” because, under the Therapeutic Substances Act (1943) it must not contain more than 20,000 extraneous micro-organisms per cubic centimeter… according to the British Medical Journal (November 4th, 1950) that “With the best of care, heavy bacterial contamination of vaccine lymph is inevitable during its preparation, and as many as 500 million organisms per ml. may be present, particularly in the tropics. They belong mostly to the cocci group, but may include also Bacillus subtilis, Bact. Coli, Pseudomones pyocyanea, yeasts and fungi; anaerobic organisms may also be occasional contaminants.” Chapter 6 The Great Demonstration Decorous and admissible language fails me, in alluding to that which might have seemed incredible thirty years ago—the commanding of vaccination on a second child of a family, when vaccination has killed the first; and then sending the father to prison for refusal. – Emeritus Professor F. W. Newman (1805–1897), October 26, 1874 Those who would give up essential Liberty to purchase a little temporary safety, deserve neither Liberty nor Safety. – Benjamin Franklin (1706–1790) Freedom is never voluntarily given by the oppressor; it must be demanded by the oppressed. – Martin Luther King Jr. (1929–1968) It was March 23, 1885, and after a long, harsh winter, the manufacturing town of Leicester, England, enjoyed one of the first beautiful spring days. Thousands from the vicinity and surrounding towns gathered to protest what they felt was an unjust law forced upon them by the British government. Although vaccination for smallpox had been used since the year 1800, the government did not begin to enforce it until the first acts in 1840 and 1853. The 1853 law set the governmental machinery in place to require every child to be vaccinated within three months of birth.

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