Nearly 100,000 in U.S. died from coronavirus in Biden's 1st month in office (BREITBART) -- Nearly 100,000 people in the United States died from the Chinese coronavirus during President Joe Biden’s first month in office. An estimated 99,763 people in the U.S. have died due to complications from the coronavirus during Biden’s first month in the White House, according to statistics provided by Johns Hopkins University. When Biden first took office, the nationwide coronavirus death toll was 397,611. Just one month later, that number is on the cusp of 500,000, as total numbers of coronavirus-related deaths in the United States reached 497,374 on Saturday.
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At Least 60 Far-Left Protestors Arrested After Storming Greek Health Ministry Police in Athens arrested at least 60 far-left protesters after they stormed the Greek Health Ministry offices in support of an imprisoned far-left terrorist. After invading the government building on Tuesday, the activists unfurled banners and threw flyers around the offices in support of convicted far-left terrorist Dimitris Koufodinas.
54 views · Feb 21st
New York Lawmaker Says the Legislature Is 'Inching Toward' Cuomo Impeachment Inquiry The New York State Democratic assemblyman who was threatened with the destruction of his career by Governor Andrew Cuomo says that the legislature is “inching toward” beginning an impeachment inquiry against the governor. Ronald Kim, a self-identified progressive socialist, was the target of a series of screaming phone threats from Cuomo when Kim refused to retract his statement about the governor’s coverup of the number of deaths in nursing homes due to COVID-19. “It will take a little time to build that consensus, but every day we are inching toward the impeachment process,” Kim told Yahoo News. He said that there were between 25 and 30 Democrats who currently support an impeachment probe. Democrats currently hold 106 of the 150 seats in that chamber so there’s a way to go yet before a majority of the assembly would agree to an impeachment inquiry. “I’m not going to let you hurt New Yorkers by lying about what happened surrounding the death of a loved one,” he said. “So I’m going to take on the lies and the unscrupulous actors, especially when they cause pain and damage to New York.” He added: “I should have done it before. And I should have done it more aggressively.” Our hero. In truth, Cuomo may have more to worry about than some backbench assembly members nipping at his heels. Federal prosecutors in Brooklyn and the FBI are very interested in finding out whether Cuomo obstructed justice by not being truthful with the Justice Department. Kim said in the “Skullduggery” interview that he has been told the investigation is focused in part on “obstruction of justice” and that as part of that he is fully prepared to recount his phone call to federal authorities. “Of course, I’m prepared to comply and spend as much time handing over as much evidence as they want,” he said. “I expect many of us to be contacted very soon.” Another issue federal law enforcement may be interested in investigating is the curious timing of legislation Cuomo backed and signed last spring that gave nursing homes and their executives immunity from lawsuits. “If we had the real-time data — which they were holding onto — we would have had the argument to repeal that immunity,” he said. “Instead, because we didn’t see the whole picture, we were only able to repeal” the immunity partially last July. “So this is one clear example of what we could have done differently in terms of policy if they had shared the data in real time,” Kim said. “But they made a choice not to do it. All of those decisions need to be investigated. Who gave him the language of the immunity? [The] industry came in and even said and bragged in a press release that we got this done for nursing homes and hospitals.” The organization that gave Cuomo the language for immunity that apparently ended up word for word in the bill was from the Greater New York Hospital Association. Two years before the law was changed, they gave the governor a $1 million donation late in his campaign. The federal prosecutor looking into the matter will have to come forth with some very serious charges for Cuomo to be in any danger. The governor has already shown how he treats members of his own party who cross him, so don’t bet on Democratic lawmakers having much enthusiasm to impeach the governor. That’s because partisanship is only bad during an impeachment when Republicans do it
83 views · Feb 21st
Understanding the Texas Energy Crisis By Ben Voth A rhetorical battle is now underway to make sure the Texas energy crisis does not go to waste. As the largest electoral star in the remnants of red states, the stakes for changing the politics of the state are considerable. The arctic weather that descended on Texas February 14 weekend flummoxed the power grid of the state and set up a debate on whether renewables like wind or fossil fuels like natural gas will bear the brunt of the blame. At the heart of the management of this question is ERCOT, the Energy Reliability Council of Texas. Outsiders may not be aware that Texas has a uniquely independent power grid that is relatively disconnected from regional energy consumers and providers. Outsiders may also be surprised to discover the dramatic growth of wind power in a state that has among the largest fossil fuel reserves in the world. The growth of wind power to be second as a source only to natural gas is the debate raging in Texas politics now. Did wind reliance help set up the energy crisis in an energy rich state? At a moderate level of study, it is apparent that both wind and natural gas was blocked from full utilization by extended severely sub-freezing weather. This is exceptionally cold for Texas and prevented even natural gas facilities from being properly prepared. The anti-fossil fuel crowd is eager to deflect criticism of wind and solar and points to how wind performed better than expected on some days of the cold blast. These surface points are near exhaustion but miss some larger deeper issues about the controversy. Has the decade-long move to invest in wind power that placed so many turbines and transmission lines in West Texas proven to be a wise investment for ERCOT and energy providers? The answer is probably ‘no.’ Some diversity of sources can be useful in such a geographically large state. Wind power can be secured from cold weather and defenders have pointed out these examples. More profound -- was the switch from coal to natural gas completely wise? Most audiences of this debate missed a key global study for 2020 showing it to be the largest reduction in CO2 emissions because of drastically lower energy use worldwide. That is not surprising when a draconian flu regime brings the global economy to a largely unprecedented stop. Not widely touted was the data showing that the earth’s atmosphere actually accelerated in its warming trend. But how? Should not a large reduction in CO2 emissions reduce global warming? In fact, the study showed that reduced particulate emissions from dominant sources of energy such as coal allowed more sunlight to reach the Earth’s surface and heat the surrounding atmosphere more effectively. Climate scientists have known these effects well since at least the 1970s. Moreover, in the midst of this cold crisis, were Texans able to purchase gasoline for their automobiles? There is little or no evidence that this energy source was greatly diminished by the cold. Imagine for a moment that all the cars in Texas were electric. How would those cars draw sufficient electricity from the grid to be ready to drive? The easy answer is that they would not, and in fact, the electrical grid would be catastrophically crippled by the demand. Gasoline is actually a uniquely efficient medium for the storage of energy compared to waiting for the wind or the solar panel. Batteries drop in their ability to store energy as temperatures turn cold. Here again, reasonable debate about how to convert all gasoline engines to electric batteries is blocked. Lucky Texans previously bought generators often fueled by their natural gas lines to power their homes in outage situations like this one. If incentives to buy solar panels were replaced with incentives to buy backup generators, a great deal of suffering could be relieved going forward. The Texas energy crisis exposes the whimsical contradictions of green energy. The goal cannot be to save the environment because reduced emissions warm the earth even more. Green energy cannot provide electric cars because there is no medium for storing such vast quantities of energy for instantaneous usage. If Texas invested more consistently in coal and natural gas as a broader energy base, the toppling of the electrical grid would have been much more difficult. The long and escalating demonization of energy production connects the crises in both Texas and California despite their distinct political practices. The cold spell in Texas was unique and exceptional. Nonetheless, the crisis in 2011 warned ERCOT that hardening of electrical generation assets against the cold was necessary. The near complete displacement of coal-fired electricity may have crippled the reserve capacity of Texas. The primary emphasis in the past decade appears to be to the task of proving Texas to be ‘greener than thou’ in its usage of wind power or removing coal plants. Texas does have one of the largest installed bases of wind power in the world. Texas electricity providers primarily advertise their capacity to provide “green energy.” Some providers brag they provide 100% green energy. This past week, many Texans would have preferred to have any energy -- whatever color it was. Dr. Ben Voth is an associate professor of rhetoric and director of debate and speech at Southern Methodist University in Dallas, Texas. His latest book Rwanda Rising includes an analysis of the latest controversies surrounding climate change. --Understanding the Texas Energy Crisis - American Thinker --https://www.americanthinker.com/articles/2021/02/understanding_the_texas_energy_crisis.html -RETRIEVED-Sun Feb 21 2021 06:25:35 GMT+0100 (Central European Standard Time)
78 views · Feb 21st

More from entryreqrd

At Least 60 Far-Left Protestors Arrested After Storming Greek Health Ministry Police in Athens arrested at least 60 far-left protesters after they stormed the Greek Health Ministry offices in support of an imprisoned far-left terrorist. After invading the government building on Tuesday, the activists unfurled banners and threw flyers around the offices in support of convicted far-left terrorist Dimitris Koufodinas.
54 views · Feb 21st
New York Lawmaker Says the Legislature Is 'Inching Toward' Cuomo Impeachment Inquiry The New York State Democratic assemblyman who was threatened with the destruction of his career by Governor Andrew Cuomo says that the legislature is “inching toward” beginning an impeachment inquiry against the governor. Ronald Kim, a self-identified progressive socialist, was the target of a series of screaming phone threats from Cuomo when Kim refused to retract his statement about the governor’s coverup of the number of deaths in nursing homes due to COVID-19. “It will take a little time to build that consensus, but every day we are inching toward the impeachment process,” Kim told Yahoo News. He said that there were between 25 and 30 Democrats who currently support an impeachment probe. Democrats currently hold 106 of the 150 seats in that chamber so there’s a way to go yet before a majority of the assembly would agree to an impeachment inquiry. “I’m not going to let you hurt New Yorkers by lying about what happened surrounding the death of a loved one,” he said. “So I’m going to take on the lies and the unscrupulous actors, especially when they cause pain and damage to New York.” He added: “I should have done it before. And I should have done it more aggressively.” Our hero. In truth, Cuomo may have more to worry about than some backbench assembly members nipping at his heels. Federal prosecutors in Brooklyn and the FBI are very interested in finding out whether Cuomo obstructed justice by not being truthful with the Justice Department. Kim said in the “Skullduggery” interview that he has been told the investigation is focused in part on “obstruction of justice” and that as part of that he is fully prepared to recount his phone call to federal authorities. “Of course, I’m prepared to comply and spend as much time handing over as much evidence as they want,” he said. “I expect many of us to be contacted very soon.” Another issue federal law enforcement may be interested in investigating is the curious timing of legislation Cuomo backed and signed last spring that gave nursing homes and their executives immunity from lawsuits. “If we had the real-time data — which they were holding onto — we would have had the argument to repeal that immunity,” he said. “Instead, because we didn’t see the whole picture, we were only able to repeal” the immunity partially last July. “So this is one clear example of what we could have done differently in terms of policy if they had shared the data in real time,” Kim said. “But they made a choice not to do it. All of those decisions need to be investigated. Who gave him the language of the immunity? [The] industry came in and even said and bragged in a press release that we got this done for nursing homes and hospitals.” The organization that gave Cuomo the language for immunity that apparently ended up word for word in the bill was from the Greater New York Hospital Association. Two years before the law was changed, they gave the governor a $1 million donation late in his campaign. The federal prosecutor looking into the matter will have to come forth with some very serious charges for Cuomo to be in any danger. The governor has already shown how he treats members of his own party who cross him, so don’t bet on Democratic lawmakers having much enthusiasm to impeach the governor. That’s because partisanship is only bad during an impeachment when Republicans do it
83 views · Feb 21st
Understanding the Texas Energy Crisis By Ben Voth A rhetorical battle is now underway to make sure the Texas energy crisis does not go to waste. As the largest electoral star in the remnants of red states, the stakes for changing the politics of the state are considerable. The arctic weather that descended on Texas February 14 weekend flummoxed the power grid of the state and set up a debate on whether renewables like wind or fossil fuels like natural gas will bear the brunt of the blame. At the heart of the management of this question is ERCOT, the Energy Reliability Council of Texas. Outsiders may not be aware that Texas has a uniquely independent power grid that is relatively disconnected from regional energy consumers and providers. Outsiders may also be surprised to discover the dramatic growth of wind power in a state that has among the largest fossil fuel reserves in the world. The growth of wind power to be second as a source only to natural gas is the debate raging in Texas politics now. Did wind reliance help set up the energy crisis in an energy rich state? At a moderate level of study, it is apparent that both wind and natural gas was blocked from full utilization by extended severely sub-freezing weather. This is exceptionally cold for Texas and prevented even natural gas facilities from being properly prepared. The anti-fossil fuel crowd is eager to deflect criticism of wind and solar and points to how wind performed better than expected on some days of the cold blast. These surface points are near exhaustion but miss some larger deeper issues about the controversy. Has the decade-long move to invest in wind power that placed so many turbines and transmission lines in West Texas proven to be a wise investment for ERCOT and energy providers? The answer is probably ‘no.’ Some diversity of sources can be useful in such a geographically large state. Wind power can be secured from cold weather and defenders have pointed out these examples. More profound -- was the switch from coal to natural gas completely wise? Most audiences of this debate missed a key global study for 2020 showing it to be the largest reduction in CO2 emissions because of drastically lower energy use worldwide. That is not surprising when a draconian flu regime brings the global economy to a largely unprecedented stop. Not widely touted was the data showing that the earth’s atmosphere actually accelerated in its warming trend. But how? Should not a large reduction in CO2 emissions reduce global warming? In fact, the study showed that reduced particulate emissions from dominant sources of energy such as coal allowed more sunlight to reach the Earth’s surface and heat the surrounding atmosphere more effectively. Climate scientists have known these effects well since at least the 1970s. Moreover, in the midst of this cold crisis, were Texans able to purchase gasoline for their automobiles? There is little or no evidence that this energy source was greatly diminished by the cold. Imagine for a moment that all the cars in Texas were electric. How would those cars draw sufficient electricity from the grid to be ready to drive? The easy answer is that they would not, and in fact, the electrical grid would be catastrophically crippled by the demand. Gasoline is actually a uniquely efficient medium for the storage of energy compared to waiting for the wind or the solar panel. Batteries drop in their ability to store energy as temperatures turn cold. Here again, reasonable debate about how to convert all gasoline engines to electric batteries is blocked. Lucky Texans previously bought generators often fueled by their natural gas lines to power their homes in outage situations like this one. If incentives to buy solar panels were replaced with incentives to buy backup generators, a great deal of suffering could be relieved going forward. The Texas energy crisis exposes the whimsical contradictions of green energy. The goal cannot be to save the environment because reduced emissions warm the earth even more. Green energy cannot provide electric cars because there is no medium for storing such vast quantities of energy for instantaneous usage. If Texas invested more consistently in coal and natural gas as a broader energy base, the toppling of the electrical grid would have been much more difficult. The long and escalating demonization of energy production connects the crises in both Texas and California despite their distinct political practices. The cold spell in Texas was unique and exceptional. Nonetheless, the crisis in 2011 warned ERCOT that hardening of electrical generation assets against the cold was necessary. The near complete displacement of coal-fired electricity may have crippled the reserve capacity of Texas. The primary emphasis in the past decade appears to be to the task of proving Texas to be ‘greener than thou’ in its usage of wind power or removing coal plants. Texas does have one of the largest installed bases of wind power in the world. Texas electricity providers primarily advertise their capacity to provide “green energy.” Some providers brag they provide 100% green energy. This past week, many Texans would have preferred to have any energy -- whatever color it was. Dr. Ben Voth is an associate professor of rhetoric and director of debate and speech at Southern Methodist University in Dallas, Texas. His latest book Rwanda Rising includes an analysis of the latest controversies surrounding climate change. --Understanding the Texas Energy Crisis - American Thinker --https://www.americanthinker.com/articles/2021/02/understanding_the_texas_energy_crisis.html -RETRIEVED-Sun Feb 21 2021 06:25:35 GMT+0100 (Central European Standard Time)
78 views · Feb 21st