Daily Devotional with Pastor Jon February 8 And the Lord said, If ye had faith as a grain of mustard seed, ye might say unto this sycamore tree, Be thou plucked up by the root, and be thou planted in the sea; and it should obey you. Luke 17:6 Why were the disciples told to speak? Because, while faith is implanted by the Word, it is unleashed through the lips (Romans 10:8-10). How did God make the world? He spoke it into existence (Psalm 33:6,9). So too, Jesus altered the course of the world and eternity when He said, ‘Waves, be still.’ ‘Lazarus, come forth.’ ‘It is Finished.’ Made in the image of God, we also speak our individual worlds into existence and alter their course by our words. This book of the law shall not depart out of thy mouth; but thou shalt meditate therein day and night, that thou mayest observe to do according to all that is written therein: for then thou shalt make thy way prosperous, and then thou shalt have good success. Joshua 1:8 The Hebrew word translated ‘meditate’ meaning ‘to mutter over and over again’, if you want to be prosperous and successful in that which the Lord has laid before you to do, mutter the Word day and night. The promises of God will be of no effect if they’re simply written in your journal or underlined in your Bible. They only take effect when they’re in your mouth. With his back to the Red Sea and the armies of Egypt barreling down upon him, Moses cried to the Lord. ‘Wherefore criest thou unto Me? Speak unto the children of Israel, that they go forward,’ (Exodus 14:15). You might be a great student of Scripture. You might even be a prayer warrior. But if you wonder why the Sea isn’t parting, could it be that the Lord is whispering to you, ‘Why are you asking Me? Speak to the sea, the tree, the mountain which looms large before you’? It was when Joshua spoke to the sun that it stood still, when Elisha spoke to Ahab that there was no rain, when Zerubabel spoke to the cornerstone of the Temple that the project came to completion. So too, tomorrow morning when the alarm goes off, you will either say, ‘Oh, no, it’s Monday morning,’ or you will say, ‘This is the day the Lord has made. I will rejoice and be glad in it,’ (Psalm 118:24) - and the choice you make will alter the course of your day. Of God, the writer of the book of Hebrews says, ‘... for He hath said, I will never leave thee, nor forsake thee. So that we may boldly say, The Lord is my helper, and I will not fear what man shall do unto me,’ (13:5-6). God hath said that we may say — not that we may know, not that we may write, not even that we may pray — but that we may say. Happy is the people whose God is the Lord (Psalm 144:15) The Lord is my shepherd. I shall not want (Psalm 23:1). The Lord is my light and my salvation. Whom shall I fear? (Psalm 27:1). The Lord is good unto them that wait for Him (Lamentations 3:25). I challenge you to write down four or five such promises from the Word on 3x5 cards, put them on your dashboard or on your desk and mutter them over and over again. Frame your world and your day with the Word as you speak it forth — and watch what happens.

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He’s Praying for Us by Greg Laurie on Feb 8, 2021 Therefore he is able, once and forever, to save those who come to God through him. He lives forever to intercede with God on their behalf. —Hebrews 7:25 When people ask me to pray for them, I always try to do it immediately. That way, I don’t forget. It’s also a good thing to ask other Christians to remember us in prayer when we’re facing a crisis. Without question, there’s power in unified prayer. Jesus said, “If two of you agree here on earth concerning anything you ask, my Father in heaven will do it for you. For where two or three gather together as my followers, I am there among them” (Matthew 18:19–20 NLT). He’s also in Heaven interceding for us right now. The Bible tells us that Jesus Christ “is able, once and forever, to save those who come to God through him. He lives forever to intercede with God on their behalf” (Hebrews 7:25 NLT). And the apostle Paul wrote, “Who then will condemn us? No one—for Christ Jesus died for us and was raised to life for us, and he is sitting in the place of honor at God’s right hand, pleading for us” (Romans 8:34 NLT). Robert Murray M’Cheyne, a 19th-century Scottish pastor, said, “If I could hear Christ praying for me in the next room, I would not fear a million enemies. Yet the distance makes no difference; he is praying for me.” By the way, Jesus Christ prayed a lot when He walked among us. He was always praying to the Father. We see Him praying all night on a mountain, praying before He chose the 12 apostles, and praying in the Garden of Gethsemane as He contemplated the horrors of the cross. We also see Him praying from the cross. So if Jesus, being God, felt the necessity to pray, then how much more should we? With all of our shortcomings and weaknesses, how much more should we follow the example that Jesus set for us?

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Verse of the Day Ye have heard that it hath been said, Thou shalt love thy neighbour, and hate thine enemy. But I say unto you, Love your enemies, bless them that curse you, do good to them that hate you, and pray for them which despitefully use you, and persecute you; That ye may be the children of your Father which is in heaven: for he maketh his sun to rise on the evil and on the good, and sendeth rain on the just and on the unjust. Matthew 5:43-45 KJV

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