This article is now 4 years old, but it's still well worth reading (I'm also including a related 2 year old article in the first comment below, it's not an EASY read, consider yourselves warned). I remember when the atrocities taking place in Romanian orphanages/institutions under (and after) the Ceausescu - that godawful megalomaniac dictator - regime were first exposed by reporters from "the outside world". Breaks my heart knowing that this STILL happens to "the unwanted" in many places around the world. "Out of sight, out of mind, not our problem anymore..." 😔 -Mrs. entryreqrd #ActuallyAutistic #DifferentNotLess #JustSaying #LetsTalkAutism --- There are many risk factors for autism, some genetic and others environmental. But few are more intriguing — and disturbing — than psychosocial deprivation in infancy. Psychosocial deprivation is essentially a lack of caregiver stimulation and investment. It is particularly common among children reared in institutions. Researchers, myself included, have been studying the effects of psychosocial deprivation in Romanian children who were institutionalized as infants. These orphans lived in large white rooms crowded with cribs. They were fed and changed but otherwise ignored. After the Ceausescu regime ended in December 1989, journalists from the United States and Europe flooded into the country and began to report on the plight of the more than 170,000 children living in state-run institutions. Many of these orphans were adopted as young children and went on to better homes. But up to 10 percent of these adoptees still have persistent social difficulties and repetitive behaviors — a set of features sometimes referred to as ‘quasi-autism.’ Autism features in these children are most likely rooted in their early lack of social experience. Experience serves as the set of instructions that guide the formation of circuits in the developing brain. When deprived of experience, the brain is left to wire itself, and the process can go awry. The path to autism in Romanian orphans is likely to be different from that of other children with the condition. Whether the orphans who are diagnosed with autism even have the same condition as others with the diagnosis is debatable. Yet understanding what gives rise to autism features in children who were socially deprived as infants could offer clues to these features more broadly, and hint at interventions to ease them. [...] https://www.spectrumnews.org/opinion/viewpoint/romanian-orphans-reveal-clues-origins-autism/
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#AutismAwareness leads to increased social inclusion. Who'd have thunk? 🙄😏 -Mrs. entryreqrd #ActuallyAutistic #DifferentNotLess #JustSaying #LetsTalkAutism --- Efforts to improve the social success of autistic adolescents and adults have often focused on teaching them ways to think and behave more like their non-autistic peers and to hide the characteristics that define them as autistic. Psychology researchers at The University of Texas at Dallas, however, have been focusing on another approach: promoting understanding and acceptance of autism among non-autistic people. [...] https://www.utdallas.edu/news/health-medicine/autism-biases-study-2021/
1.2k views · Feb 6th
This 2 years old article was a VERY good read! 👍 I generally only stim (I call it "fiddle") when I need to focus, then I spin/twirl my hair, I doodle, I play with silly putty or clay. I sometimes spin (I put my whole weight on one foot and walk with the other, around and around) as a form of distraction. I sometimes flap when I'm upset/frustrated, and as a child I both flapped and squirmed when I was REALLY happy and/or excited. Stimming has never been something that I've been told NOT to do, neither as an adult nor as a child. Others are/were not so lucky. -Mrs. entryreqrd #ActuallyAutistic #BornThisWay #AutismAwareness #LetsTalkAutism --- Rhythmic, repetitive behaviors are a hallmark of autism. Hand-flapping, spinning in circles, body rocking, vocalizations such as grunting and muttering, and other habits can be disquieting to people unfamiliar with them. Scientists and clinicians have long puzzled over what these behaviors mean — and how to respond to them. For many years, experts thought repetitive movements resulted from deprivation or even trauma, and that they hindered learning. Psychologist Ole Ivar Lovaas, an early autism specialist, reportedly referred to them as “garbage behavior.” He made suppressing these habits a priority. Lovaas and his followers electrically shocked, screamed at, shook and slapped autistic children. Others prescribed antipsychotics and other stupefying drugs. Even in today’s sometimes gentler treatment paradigms, therapists often train children to have ‘quiet hands’ as opposed to freely flapping ones. [...] https://www.spectrumnews.org/opinion/viewpoint/stimming-therapeutic-autistic-people-deserves-acceptance/
152 views · Feb 4th

More from entryreqrd

#AutismAwareness leads to increased social inclusion. Who'd have thunk? 🙄😏 -Mrs. entryreqrd #ActuallyAutistic #DifferentNotLess #JustSaying #LetsTalkAutism --- Efforts to improve the social success of autistic adolescents and adults have often focused on teaching them ways to think and behave more like their non-autistic peers and to hide the characteristics that define them as autistic. Psychology researchers at The University of Texas at Dallas, however, have been focusing on another approach: promoting understanding and acceptance of autism among non-autistic people. [...] https://www.utdallas.edu/news/health-medicine/autism-biases-study-2021/
1.2k views · Feb 6th
This 2 years old article was a VERY good read! 👍 I generally only stim (I call it "fiddle") when I need to focus, then I spin/twirl my hair, I doodle, I play with silly putty or clay. I sometimes spin (I put my whole weight on one foot and walk with the other, around and around) as a form of distraction. I sometimes flap when I'm upset/frustrated, and as a child I both flapped and squirmed when I was REALLY happy and/or excited. Stimming has never been something that I've been told NOT to do, neither as an adult nor as a child. Others are/were not so lucky. -Mrs. entryreqrd #ActuallyAutistic #BornThisWay #AutismAwareness #LetsTalkAutism --- Rhythmic, repetitive behaviors are a hallmark of autism. Hand-flapping, spinning in circles, body rocking, vocalizations such as grunting and muttering, and other habits can be disquieting to people unfamiliar with them. Scientists and clinicians have long puzzled over what these behaviors mean — and how to respond to them. For many years, experts thought repetitive movements resulted from deprivation or even trauma, and that they hindered learning. Psychologist Ole Ivar Lovaas, an early autism specialist, reportedly referred to them as “garbage behavior.” He made suppressing these habits a priority. Lovaas and his followers electrically shocked, screamed at, shook and slapped autistic children. Others prescribed antipsychotics and other stupefying drugs. Even in today’s sometimes gentler treatment paradigms, therapists often train children to have ‘quiet hands’ as opposed to freely flapping ones. [...] https://www.spectrumnews.org/opinion/viewpoint/stimming-therapeutic-autistic-people-deserves-acceptance/
152 views · Feb 4th