Shot Out to @konnichiwa aka jodyhighroller and Thanks again as always for the wire Support!

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More from Universe Japan

Godiva Curry Bread? Only in Japan… With close to 100 years in business and a worldwide reputation for quality, many would say that Godiva is the first name in chocolate. Just as many people would probably also say, however, that Godiva is the last company they think of when they’re craving curry. And yet, right now you can buy Godiva curry bread in Japan. At first, this might seem like a bizarre new sphere for Godiva to be trying to force itself into. A number of home chefs in Japan, though, swear by adding chocolate to their curry, melting a piece in with the rest of the roux for another layer of complex richness. Godiva isn’t going solo on this, either. The new Godiva Beef Curry Bread is a joint effort with Japanese convenience store chain Lawson, and as such, it’s a very affordable 280-yen (US$2.70) luxury. What makes the Godiva curry bread special? First there’s the roux, which boasts Godiva chocolate as one of its ingredients. There’s also the bread itself, with Godiva cocoa powder mixed into the dough. Because of the chocolate, the bread has a darker color than the light brown normally associated with Japanese curry bread. It’s almost black, and taking a sniff you can detect a faint chocolatey aspect to the fragrance. Interesting to try. Pop it into a microwave for 15 -20 seconds and elevate the flavors!

165 views · Feb 4th
Winner of NASA’s Mars residence design contest releases Japan’s first 3D-printed house prototypes The company cites many reasons for taking this plunge; they argue that decreasing numbers of carpenters, particularly in Japan, are driving up the costs of traditionally constructed homes, and that this situation will only intensify as the currently active carpenters retire without sufficient supply to replace them. By allowing a robot to 3D-print the entire house the system will become automated and assumedly drive down costs. The relatively cheap cost of their sphere-styled homes — a 30 cubic meter (39.23 cubic yard) home is assumed to cost around 3,000,000 yen (US$28,582) — means avoiding being locked into the long-term mortgages mentioned earlier, and makes the purchase of a home more akin to buying a new car. What’s more, the company claims that their architectural 3D-printer is capable of building one of these spherical abodes in around 24 hours with no human personnel required. Spherical house in the midst of nature. The 3D-printed homes have another advantage besides their cost and automation. With climate change presenting a very real threat to local environments, these houses were created to better withstand severe weather, particularly earthquakes and typhoons. The homes themselves were designed by world-renowned architectural talent: Masayuki Sono, winner of NASA’s 3D-Printed Habitat Challenge in 2015. The publication of the house designs is sure to earn some interest, considering the steadily increasing popularity of tiny homes with prospective buyers. Do you think you would be comfortable living in a house like this one? Stay tuned for more updates as the project progresses! https://youtu.be/GqIV0fVTLUE
132 views · Feb 4th

More from Universe Japan

Godiva Curry Bread? Only in Japan… With close to 100 years in business and a worldwide reputation for quality, many would say that Godiva is the first name in chocolate. Just as many people would probably also say, however, that Godiva is the last company they think of when they’re craving curry. And yet, right now you can buy Godiva curry bread in Japan. At first, this might seem like a bizarre new sphere for Godiva to be trying to force itself into. A number of home chefs in Japan, though, swear by adding chocolate to their curry, melting a piece in with the rest of the roux for another layer of complex richness. Godiva isn’t going solo on this, either. The new Godiva Beef Curry Bread is a joint effort with Japanese convenience store chain Lawson, and as such, it’s a very affordable 280-yen (US$2.70) luxury. What makes the Godiva curry bread special? First there’s the roux, which boasts Godiva chocolate as one of its ingredients. There’s also the bread itself, with Godiva cocoa powder mixed into the dough. Because of the chocolate, the bread has a darker color than the light brown normally associated with Japanese curry bread. It’s almost black, and taking a sniff you can detect a faint chocolatey aspect to the fragrance. Interesting to try. Pop it into a microwave for 15 -20 seconds and elevate the flavors!

165 views · Feb 4th
Winner of NASA’s Mars residence design contest releases Japan’s first 3D-printed house prototypes The company cites many reasons for taking this plunge; they argue that decreasing numbers of carpenters, particularly in Japan, are driving up the costs of traditionally constructed homes, and that this situation will only intensify as the currently active carpenters retire without sufficient supply to replace them. By allowing a robot to 3D-print the entire house the system will become automated and assumedly drive down costs. The relatively cheap cost of their sphere-styled homes — a 30 cubic meter (39.23 cubic yard) home is assumed to cost around 3,000,000 yen (US$28,582) — means avoiding being locked into the long-term mortgages mentioned earlier, and makes the purchase of a home more akin to buying a new car. What’s more, the company claims that their architectural 3D-printer is capable of building one of these spherical abodes in around 24 hours with no human personnel required. Spherical house in the midst of nature. The 3D-printed homes have another advantage besides their cost and automation. With climate change presenting a very real threat to local environments, these houses were created to better withstand severe weather, particularly earthquakes and typhoons. The homes themselves were designed by world-renowned architectural talent: Masayuki Sono, winner of NASA’s 3D-Printed Habitat Challenge in 2015. The publication of the house designs is sure to earn some interest, considering the steadily increasing popularity of tiny homes with prospective buyers. Do you think you would be comfortable living in a house like this one? Stay tuned for more updates as the project progresses! https://youtu.be/GqIV0fVTLUE
132 views · Feb 4th