FebruARTy 7th - "Martyr"

A smug self-sacrifice for the greater good. The two generals square off for the final showdown while the sappers abscond with the prize! I'm really getting into the groove with this art challenge! I decided to stick with the pencils here and skip the pen. I like it better this way. Scheduled in advance (Feb 7, 12:00 - We'll see what time it actually posts...). I don't usually get to my drawing setup on the weekend. @whitefoxthewhit #FebruARTy https://www.minds.com/newsfeed/1203078806834982912

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More from Steve, Always

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This is probably going to seem completely random but whatever. One thing I’ve discovered about relaxation, distressing, and rejuvenation—one trick that I’ve learned—is that, for me at least, it comes down to forgetting about time. The deeper you lose track, the longer it will seem you’ve been “gone.” Completely losing yourself in a daydream, where you forget time and space, for just five minutes does more to refresh yourself than a 30 minute break where you’re constantly checking the time. It reminds me of those old tales across cultures of people disappearing into fairyland for what they think is only a few days, to come back and decades or centuries have passed—like the Japanese fairytale Urashima Taro. There’s a weird thing that occurs outside of time—9 hours of sleep seems like a short time, and a five minute daydream could seem like much longer, if you really let go. You kinda don’t know how long it’s been. But, no matter how long it’s been, you feel like you’ve been far away from it all. Sometimes it can be tricky to do this, especially at work during breaks or whatever. There’s a reason that the fairytales associate this escape with some sort of danger. It takes a certain level of trust that you will “come back” in time. But that’s why God made alarm clocks. Anyway, thank you for listening to my TED talk. I should probably create a guided meditation or something. #musing
420 views · Feb 6th

Appreciate it

65 views · Feb 6th

More from Steve, Always

repeat
420 views
This is probably going to seem completely random but whatever. One thing I’ve discovered about relaxation, distressing, and rejuvenation—one trick that I’ve learned—is that, for me at least, it comes down to forgetting about time. The deeper you lose track, the longer it will seem you’ve been “gone.” Completely losing yourself in a daydream, where you forget time and space, for just five minutes does more to refresh yourself than a 30 minute break where you’re constantly checking the time. It reminds me of those old tales across cultures of people disappearing into fairyland for what they think is only a few days, to come back and decades or centuries have passed—like the Japanese fairytale Urashima Taro. There’s a weird thing that occurs outside of time—9 hours of sleep seems like a short time, and a five minute daydream could seem like much longer, if you really let go. You kinda don’t know how long it’s been. But, no matter how long it’s been, you feel like you’ve been far away from it all. Sometimes it can be tricky to do this, especially at work during breaks or whatever. There’s a reason that the fairytales associate this escape with some sort of danger. It takes a certain level of trust that you will “come back” in time. But that’s why God made alarm clocks. Anyway, thank you for listening to my TED talk. I should probably create a guided meditation or something. #musing
420 views · Feb 6th

Appreciate it

65 views · Feb 6th