Today we reached 502.71K total views @UniverseJapan and I wanted to Thank you ALL for your Support and post engagement! I hope to continue to share even more interesting posts about Japan in 2021 and beyond. A Special shot out to all on the Wall Of Thanks! Kazuhiro aka @Aragmar Daisuke aka @ano_nym777 Nobuo aka @Bunjaman Katsuo aka @Darkminaz Katsuro aka @driftz27 Takumi aka @FoxFox Hiroki aka @gangstermailsexy Ryuunosuke aka @GemStar7 Satoshi aka @JonW116 Mitsuo aka @KresimirPavlovic Haruto aka @LeonRebodos Ryoto aka @MichaelJGerrior Satoshi aka @Sentinus Yuudai aka @SGTHoc Ryuu/Mamoru aka @SleepingDragon Masaaki aka @thatbigboi Riku aka @TheBradyReport Atsushi aka @VaudevilleVerne Your name here :)

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More from Universe Japan

Shot Out and Thanks to @SaraBonito for the wire Support!

304 views · Jan 14th

Shot Out and Thanks again as always for the wire Support! Daisuke aka @ano_nym777 A Valuable and Generous Member of the Wall of Thanks!

227 views · Jan 13th
Kintsugi - Japan's ancient art of embracing imperfection Meaning “joining with gold”, this centuries-old art is more than an aesthetic. For the Japanese, it’s part of a broader philosophy of embracing the beauty of human flaws. Most people don’t purposefully shatter their cherished pieces of pottery, but that isn’t always the case in Japanese culture. Adorning broken ceramics with a lacquer mixed with powdered gold is part of a more than 500-year-old Japanese tradition that highlights imperfections rather than hiding them. This not only teaches calm when a cherished piece of pottery breaks; it is a reminder of the beauty of human fragility as well. In a world that so often prizes youth, perfection and excess, embracing the old and battered may seem strange. But the 15th-Century practice of kintsugi, meaning “to join with gold”, is a reminder to stay optimistic when things fall apart and to celebrate the flaws and missteps of life. The kintsugi technique is an extension of the Japanese philosophy of wabi-sabi, which sees beauty in the incomplete and value in simplicity. The broken pieces’ gilded restoration usually takes up to three months, as the fragments are carefully glued together with the sap of an indigenous Japanese tree, left to dry for a few weeks and then adorned with gold running along its cracks. In an age of mass production and quick disposal, learning to accept and celebrate scars and flaws is a powerful lesson in humanity and sustainability. https://youtu.be/r9LMKGte0UU
6.84k views · Jan 13th

More from Universe Japan

Shot Out and Thanks to @SaraBonito for the wire Support!

304 views · Jan 14th

Shot Out and Thanks again as always for the wire Support! Daisuke aka @ano_nym777 A Valuable and Generous Member of the Wall of Thanks!

227 views · Jan 13th
Kintsugi - Japan's ancient art of embracing imperfection Meaning “joining with gold”, this centuries-old art is more than an aesthetic. For the Japanese, it’s part of a broader philosophy of embracing the beauty of human flaws. Most people don’t purposefully shatter their cherished pieces of pottery, but that isn’t always the case in Japanese culture. Adorning broken ceramics with a lacquer mixed with powdered gold is part of a more than 500-year-old Japanese tradition that highlights imperfections rather than hiding them. This not only teaches calm when a cherished piece of pottery breaks; it is a reminder of the beauty of human fragility as well. In a world that so often prizes youth, perfection and excess, embracing the old and battered may seem strange. But the 15th-Century practice of kintsugi, meaning “to join with gold”, is a reminder to stay optimistic when things fall apart and to celebrate the flaws and missteps of life. The kintsugi technique is an extension of the Japanese philosophy of wabi-sabi, which sees beauty in the incomplete and value in simplicity. The broken pieces’ gilded restoration usually takes up to three months, as the fragments are carefully glued together with the sap of an indigenous Japanese tree, left to dry for a few weeks and then adorned with gold running along its cracks. In an age of mass production and quick disposal, learning to accept and celebrate scars and flaws is a powerful lesson in humanity and sustainability. https://youtu.be/r9LMKGte0UU
6.84k views · Jan 13th