Artist Adolph Tidemand (1814–1876) and Hans Gude (1825–1903) Title Norwegian: Brudeferd i Hardanger Bridal procession on the Hardangerfjord

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Members of the Art et Liberté Group, an Egyptian Surrealist group. Front row, left to right: Jean Moscatelli, Kamel el Telmissany, Angelo de Riz, Ramses Younan, Fouad Kamel. Back row, left to right: Albert Cossery, unidentified, Georges Henein, Maurice Fahmy, Raoul Curiel. "In March 1938, the Egyptian poet and critic Georges Henein and a small group of friends disrupted a lecture in Cairo given by the Alexandria-born Italian Futurist F.T. Marinetti, who was an outspoken supporter of Mussolini. Six months later, Henein, along with the Egyptian writer Anwar Kamel, the Italian anarchist painter Angelo de Riz, and thirty-four other artists, writers, journalists, and lawyers, signed the manifesto “Vive l’Art Dégénéré!” (“Long Live Degenerate Art!”) that would inaugurate Art et Liberté, a short-lived but influential artists’ collective based in Egypt that is the focus of an illuminating exhibition currently at the Tate Liverpool, in Britain, covering the years 1938–1948. Printed in Arabic and French, with a facsimile of Guernica on its reverse, the declaration was a direct challenge to the previous year’s Nazi-organized exhibition “Entartete ‘Kunst’” (“Degenerate ‘Art’”), which presented art by Chagall, Kandinsky and other modern artists, largely Jewish, that the Nazi Party deemed decadent, morally reprehensible or otherwise harmful to the German people." - https://www.nybooks.com/daily/2018/02/03/art-et-liberte-egypts-surrealists/ "(...) The group declared that it was “mere idiocy and folly to reduce modern art… to a fanaticism for any particular religion, race, or nation.” Surrealism—in its rejection of tyranny in any form and by championing uninhibited freedom of expression—was a fitting counterpoint that the group believed could also be harnessed to bring about social change." - https://www.nybooks.com/daily/2018/02/03/art-et-liberte-egypts-surrealists/

58 views · Jan 14th

Poster for Jules Massenet's Le mage, 1891, for the 16 March première of the opera. Original size: 0,890 x 0,610 m - Le mage is an opera in five acts by Jules Massenet to a French libretto by Jean Richepin. It was first performed at the Paris Opéra in Paris on 16 March 1891 in costumes by Charles Bianchini and sets by Auguste Alfred Rubé, Philippe Chaperon and Marcel Jambon (Act I), Amable and Eugène Gardy (Act II), Alfred Lemeunier (Act III), and Jean-Baptiste Lavastre and Eugène Carpezat (Acts IV and V).

32 views · Jan 13th

Edison's Greatest Marvel--The Vitascope Poster for The Vitascope showing a movie audience, watching a large screen with women dancing on it. A small orchestra plays in front of the screen. The theatre has a box which several more people have packed into. The Library of Congress places the scene in New York, this, combined with the date, would make this the April 23, 1896 reveal of the technology at Koster and Bial's Music Hall in New York City. Lithographic colour poster, Height: 97 cm (38.1 in); Width: 73 cm (28.7 in) 29057B U.S. Copyright Office - Vitascope was an early film projector first demonstrated in 1895 by Charles Francis Jenkins and Thomas Armat. They had made modifications to Jenkins' patented Phantoscope, which cast images via film and electric light onto a wall or screen. The Vitascope is a large electrically-powered projector that uses light to cast images. The images being cast are originally taken by a kinetoscope mechanism onto gelatin film. Using an intermittent mechanism, the film negatives produced up to fifty frames per second. The shutter opens and closes to reveal new images. This device can produce up to 3,000 negatives per minute

41 views · Jan 13th

More from GaelicHymns

Members of the Art et Liberté Group, an Egyptian Surrealist group. Front row, left to right: Jean Moscatelli, Kamel el Telmissany, Angelo de Riz, Ramses Younan, Fouad Kamel. Back row, left to right: Albert Cossery, unidentified, Georges Henein, Maurice Fahmy, Raoul Curiel. "In March 1938, the Egyptian poet and critic Georges Henein and a small group of friends disrupted a lecture in Cairo given by the Alexandria-born Italian Futurist F.T. Marinetti, who was an outspoken supporter of Mussolini. Six months later, Henein, along with the Egyptian writer Anwar Kamel, the Italian anarchist painter Angelo de Riz, and thirty-four other artists, writers, journalists, and lawyers, signed the manifesto “Vive l’Art Dégénéré!” (“Long Live Degenerate Art!”) that would inaugurate Art et Liberté, a short-lived but influential artists’ collective based in Egypt that is the focus of an illuminating exhibition currently at the Tate Liverpool, in Britain, covering the years 1938–1948. Printed in Arabic and French, with a facsimile of Guernica on its reverse, the declaration was a direct challenge to the previous year’s Nazi-organized exhibition “Entartete ‘Kunst’” (“Degenerate ‘Art’”), which presented art by Chagall, Kandinsky and other modern artists, largely Jewish, that the Nazi Party deemed decadent, morally reprehensible or otherwise harmful to the German people." - https://www.nybooks.com/daily/2018/02/03/art-et-liberte-egypts-surrealists/ "(...) The group declared that it was “mere idiocy and folly to reduce modern art… to a fanaticism for any particular religion, race, or nation.” Surrealism—in its rejection of tyranny in any form and by championing uninhibited freedom of expression—was a fitting counterpoint that the group believed could also be harnessed to bring about social change." - https://www.nybooks.com/daily/2018/02/03/art-et-liberte-egypts-surrealists/

58 views · Jan 14th

Poster for Jules Massenet's Le mage, 1891, for the 16 March première of the opera. Original size: 0,890 x 0,610 m - Le mage is an opera in five acts by Jules Massenet to a French libretto by Jean Richepin. It was first performed at the Paris Opéra in Paris on 16 March 1891 in costumes by Charles Bianchini and sets by Auguste Alfred Rubé, Philippe Chaperon and Marcel Jambon (Act I), Amable and Eugène Gardy (Act II), Alfred Lemeunier (Act III), and Jean-Baptiste Lavastre and Eugène Carpezat (Acts IV and V).

32 views · Jan 13th

Edison's Greatest Marvel--The Vitascope Poster for The Vitascope showing a movie audience, watching a large screen with women dancing on it. A small orchestra plays in front of the screen. The theatre has a box which several more people have packed into. The Library of Congress places the scene in New York, this, combined with the date, would make this the April 23, 1896 reveal of the technology at Koster and Bial's Music Hall in New York City. Lithographic colour poster, Height: 97 cm (38.1 in); Width: 73 cm (28.7 in) 29057B U.S. Copyright Office - Vitascope was an early film projector first demonstrated in 1895 by Charles Francis Jenkins and Thomas Armat. They had made modifications to Jenkins' patented Phantoscope, which cast images via film and electric light onto a wall or screen. The Vitascope is a large electrically-powered projector that uses light to cast images. The images being cast are originally taken by a kinetoscope mechanism onto gelatin film. Using an intermittent mechanism, the film negatives produced up to fifty frames per second. The shutter opens and closes to reveal new images. This device can produce up to 3,000 negatives per minute

41 views · Jan 13th