Deer. Serpent. Wolf. Eagle. The kindred-animals of the Æsir can still be ridden by skilled truth-seekers in command of the spiritual. Especially during Yuletide, when the veil decorating the entrance to the otherworld is at its thinnest. Speaking of the otherworldly, Verjaseiðr — the name of our new album — can be interpreted as “spiritual protection-habits” or “defense-magic”, both of which are heathen, spiritual concepts that relate to our album title. One such track in particular is Ǫndskuggi which means “soul shadow” or “shadow-self” — a well-known psychological concept that deals with the dark side of anyone’s unknown, deeper personality... Read More ► https://draugablikk.com/myth-mankind/verjaseidr-to-protect-oneself-against-evil-while-denouncing-chaos Listen on Spotify, Apple Music, etc. ► https://legen.do/Verjaseidr Watch on YouTube ► https://youtu.be/YcG0IAwwnng

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The winter solstice is upon us — in this year of 2020, it occurred today on the 21st of December at 11:02 CET. Traditionally, the day of the Winter Solstice kicked of the 12-day long Yuletide (Jól/Jul) festivities of Norse, Anglo-Saxon, Gothic, and Germanic Europe. Considering the current state of the world, truth and tradition have never been more important. Hence, we chose to celebrate today’s cosmic event by releasing the audio animatic of the 5th song — Hreinnhǫfði — from our new album “Verjaseiðr” on YouTube, so feel free to head over to our channel a using http://draugablikk.tv Verjaseiðr listen-link: https://legen.do/Verjaseidr (Spotify, etc.) Last night, Freyr burst across the dark earth of North-Western Europe riding his wild companion Gullinbursti, the bristling boar of Norse tradition. Freyr does this every year to bring about hope and refreshed courage to help defeat the long dark winter — of course, with the aid of the Winter Solstice and the symbolic death and rebirth of the sun. Freyr’s ride kicked off this year’s Jól, known to many as Yuletide. As mentioned above, Jól is an ancient 12-night long celebration that hails back to prehistoric times. It signifies the end of the old and the beginning of the new. Thus Jól is the most important of all the Nordic ritualistic festivities. A few words on the history of Christmas: As most are aware, Óðinn was known by many names, and two of those are related to the Yuletide: Jólnir and Jólfaðr, the latter meaning “Father Yuletide”. During Jól, Óðinn rides the sky on his eight-legged horse Sleipnir accompanied by his Valkyries, gods, and a posse of restless dead warriors as he leads a Wild Hunt (the Oskorei, Ásgarðr-reid in Old Norse) with incredible enthusiasm. Even though Óðinn and his hunters are a dangerous entourage, the children of the old north would leave their boots out by the hearth on the eve of the Winter Solstice, filled with straw and sugar for Óðinn’s horse Sleipnir. In return, Óðinn would leave them a gift for feeding his horse so he could continue the hunt. In modern times, the Wild Hunt went through a cultural change and the horse Sleipnir became a reindeer, while Óðinn became various Santa Claus incarnations, which eventually became integrated with Christmas as we know it today. There might be some irony to this cultural evolution in the sense that in even earlier times, reindeer and elk were the primary sacred spirit animals of Cimmerian and Scythian shamans who lived on the Eurasian steppes, the deer being a primary vehicle for traveling the spirit world. Many scholars believe the ancient societies of the Eurasian steppe have greatly influenced the myths of Óðinn (as well as his shamanic abilities, including his cloaked outfit.) As with many other heathen traditions, Christian missionaries appropriated the tradition of Jól and renamed it to the “12 days of Christmas” to undermine heathen beliefs. Since the people of ancient Fennoscandia showed no sign of accepting Christian doctrine or custom, the Church had to slowly lure the people in, and to some extent, “brain-wash” them by “stealing” as many traditions and possible and reskin them in the image of Christianity. It should also be noted that Yule’s first night is known as Mōdraniht in Anglo-Saxon, meaning “Mothernight” — again, it represents the world’s rebirth from the darkness of winter and is, of course, related to the sun. Mōdraniht is the shortest day of Jól and the longest night of the year, and the time when Freyja performs rituals to communicate with female ancestral spirits known as dísir. The dísir are spirits associated with fate and destiny and include the three Norns — who can be either benevolent or antagonistic to humans. The earliest known written reference to Jól mentions the phrase “to drink Jól.” The Old Norse literature also tells of the Jólablót, suggesting a “Yule Sacrifice” took place where humans might have been sacrificed alongside various animals.

38 views · Dec 21st, 2020

More info on our new album! “Verjaseiðr” will be conjured into existence during the day and night of Sunday 20 to ensure it is readily available in time for this year’s winter solstice. Listen-link: https://legen.do/Verjaseidr Also, we would like to share a few words on the ancient tradition of jól and yuletide: many scholars and linguists find it difficult to interpret the meaning of the Old Norse word jól. Our view is simple: We believe the word jól means wheel — as in the wheel of time that comes full circle with the sun’s symbolic death and rebirth at the winter solstice. Interestingly, the Swedish word “hjul” means wheel, as in a car’s wheels. Is it a coincidence the words “hjul” and “jól” sound almost identical when spoken? Speaking of jól and the sun, are you prepared for Monday’s winter solstice? Since prehistory, the winter solstice has been a significant time of year in many cultures. Perhaps even more so in Scandinavia and Finland because of the relative closeness to the North-pole. The winter solstice is also a time of reflection during the darkest and longest night of the year. Hence, we are pleased to announce our new album “Verjaseiðr” will be released in time for this year’s winter solstice — which occurs this Monday, December 21 at 11:02 CET. Verjaseiðr roughly translates to “protection-habits” or “defense-magic.” The Old Norse word “verja” means to thwart or defend. “Seiðr” can be translated to “culture” or habitual practice and was a specific form of ancient ritual common in ancient Fennoscandia, used for many purposes, including to heal and protect oneself from primeval evil during long dark winters. Finally, we hope you will find inspiration in the ritualistic, somewhat hypnotic sound of Verjaseiðr. Our intent is just: to reinspire ancient practices and common sense capable of resisting true evil — the kind that grew out of ancient Babylon, to give an example.

22 views · Dec 19th, 2020

Hiǫrtr. Ormr. Úlfr. Arn. Myrkt var af nótt. As some of you might have noticed, we have been on hiatus for some time. How come? Rest assured, it is not because the world seems to be in an almost completely frozen state of mind. No, not that. The reason is, should we say, more… eventful. With all the ancestral might and inspiring wisdom we could muster, the completion of a new Draugablíkk-album has secretly been carried out in the past couple of months. And without further ado, we hereby present the cover art for our upcoming release, “Verjaseiðr”. The new album will be available before the year-end and has already been cleared for distribution by Apple Music, Spotify, and all the others. Although we are not going to reveal the details of “Verjaseiðr” in this post, we can share that work started in 2019, and that it has been a long, sluggish, and murky night ever since. Our forthcoming album deals with the dark, the deadly, and the otherworldly, and most importantly: primeval evil. In a good way, as per our intent. While on the subject of other-worldly, you might find it interesting that in ancient belief systems, the deer’s symbolic role is to fight against evil spirits, besides as a mythical being that enables well-versed men to travel fastly across the night sky — perhaps not entirely unlike Óðinn and his eight-legged steed Sleipnir. For those who listen carefully, “Verjaseiðr” might bring protection against any long dark winter that might come upon us. Those whose soul and spirit are as strong and open as their cell phone reception might be especially satisfied. Oh, almost forgot: It is likely no coincidence the stag Eikþyrnir gnaws at Yggdrasil while also standing watch over Valhǫll.

1.07k views · Dec 14th, 2020

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The winter solstice is upon us — in this year of 2020, it occurred today on the 21st of December at 11:02 CET. Traditionally, the day of the Winter Solstice kicked of the 12-day long Yuletide (Jól/Jul) festivities of Norse, Anglo-Saxon, Gothic, and Germanic Europe. Considering the current state of the world, truth and tradition have never been more important. Hence, we chose to celebrate today’s cosmic event by releasing the audio animatic of the 5th song — Hreinnhǫfði — from our new album “Verjaseiðr” on YouTube, so feel free to head over to our channel a using http://draugablikk.tv Verjaseiðr listen-link: https://legen.do/Verjaseidr (Spotify, etc.) Last night, Freyr burst across the dark earth of North-Western Europe riding his wild companion Gullinbursti, the bristling boar of Norse tradition. Freyr does this every year to bring about hope and refreshed courage to help defeat the long dark winter — of course, with the aid of the Winter Solstice and the symbolic death and rebirth of the sun. Freyr’s ride kicked off this year’s Jól, known to many as Yuletide. As mentioned above, Jól is an ancient 12-night long celebration that hails back to prehistoric times. It signifies the end of the old and the beginning of the new. Thus Jól is the most important of all the Nordic ritualistic festivities. A few words on the history of Christmas: As most are aware, Óðinn was known by many names, and two of those are related to the Yuletide: Jólnir and Jólfaðr, the latter meaning “Father Yuletide”. During Jól, Óðinn rides the sky on his eight-legged horse Sleipnir accompanied by his Valkyries, gods, and a posse of restless dead warriors as he leads a Wild Hunt (the Oskorei, Ásgarðr-reid in Old Norse) with incredible enthusiasm. Even though Óðinn and his hunters are a dangerous entourage, the children of the old north would leave their boots out by the hearth on the eve of the Winter Solstice, filled with straw and sugar for Óðinn’s horse Sleipnir. In return, Óðinn would leave them a gift for feeding his horse so he could continue the hunt. In modern times, the Wild Hunt went through a cultural change and the horse Sleipnir became a reindeer, while Óðinn became various Santa Claus incarnations, which eventually became integrated with Christmas as we know it today. There might be some irony to this cultural evolution in the sense that in even earlier times, reindeer and elk were the primary sacred spirit animals of Cimmerian and Scythian shamans who lived on the Eurasian steppes, the deer being a primary vehicle for traveling the spirit world. Many scholars believe the ancient societies of the Eurasian steppe have greatly influenced the myths of Óðinn (as well as his shamanic abilities, including his cloaked outfit.) As with many other heathen traditions, Christian missionaries appropriated the tradition of Jól and renamed it to the “12 days of Christmas” to undermine heathen beliefs. Since the people of ancient Fennoscandia showed no sign of accepting Christian doctrine or custom, the Church had to slowly lure the people in, and to some extent, “brain-wash” them by “stealing” as many traditions and possible and reskin them in the image of Christianity. It should also be noted that Yule’s first night is known as Mōdraniht in Anglo-Saxon, meaning “Mothernight” — again, it represents the world’s rebirth from the darkness of winter and is, of course, related to the sun. Mōdraniht is the shortest day of Jól and the longest night of the year, and the time when Freyja performs rituals to communicate with female ancestral spirits known as dísir. The dísir are spirits associated with fate and destiny and include the three Norns — who can be either benevolent or antagonistic to humans. The earliest known written reference to Jól mentions the phrase “to drink Jól.” The Old Norse literature also tells of the Jólablót, suggesting a “Yule Sacrifice” took place where humans might have been sacrificed alongside various animals.

38 views · Dec 21st, 2020

More info on our new album! “Verjaseiðr” will be conjured into existence during the day and night of Sunday 20 to ensure it is readily available in time for this year’s winter solstice. Listen-link: https://legen.do/Verjaseidr Also, we would like to share a few words on the ancient tradition of jól and yuletide: many scholars and linguists find it difficult to interpret the meaning of the Old Norse word jól. Our view is simple: We believe the word jól means wheel — as in the wheel of time that comes full circle with the sun’s symbolic death and rebirth at the winter solstice. Interestingly, the Swedish word “hjul” means wheel, as in a car’s wheels. Is it a coincidence the words “hjul” and “jól” sound almost identical when spoken? Speaking of jól and the sun, are you prepared for Monday’s winter solstice? Since prehistory, the winter solstice has been a significant time of year in many cultures. Perhaps even more so in Scandinavia and Finland because of the relative closeness to the North-pole. The winter solstice is also a time of reflection during the darkest and longest night of the year. Hence, we are pleased to announce our new album “Verjaseiðr” will be released in time for this year’s winter solstice — which occurs this Monday, December 21 at 11:02 CET. Verjaseiðr roughly translates to “protection-habits” or “defense-magic.” The Old Norse word “verja” means to thwart or defend. “Seiðr” can be translated to “culture” or habitual practice and was a specific form of ancient ritual common in ancient Fennoscandia, used for many purposes, including to heal and protect oneself from primeval evil during long dark winters. Finally, we hope you will find inspiration in the ritualistic, somewhat hypnotic sound of Verjaseiðr. Our intent is just: to reinspire ancient practices and common sense capable of resisting true evil — the kind that grew out of ancient Babylon, to give an example.

22 views · Dec 19th, 2020

Hiǫrtr. Ormr. Úlfr. Arn. Myrkt var af nótt. As some of you might have noticed, we have been on hiatus for some time. How come? Rest assured, it is not because the world seems to be in an almost completely frozen state of mind. No, not that. The reason is, should we say, more… eventful. With all the ancestral might and inspiring wisdom we could muster, the completion of a new Draugablíkk-album has secretly been carried out in the past couple of months. And without further ado, we hereby present the cover art for our upcoming release, “Verjaseiðr”. The new album will be available before the year-end and has already been cleared for distribution by Apple Music, Spotify, and all the others. Although we are not going to reveal the details of “Verjaseiðr” in this post, we can share that work started in 2019, and that it has been a long, sluggish, and murky night ever since. Our forthcoming album deals with the dark, the deadly, and the otherworldly, and most importantly: primeval evil. In a good way, as per our intent. While on the subject of other-worldly, you might find it interesting that in ancient belief systems, the deer’s symbolic role is to fight against evil spirits, besides as a mythical being that enables well-versed men to travel fastly across the night sky — perhaps not entirely unlike Óðinn and his eight-legged steed Sleipnir. For those who listen carefully, “Verjaseiðr” might bring protection against any long dark winter that might come upon us. Those whose soul and spirit are as strong and open as their cell phone reception might be especially satisfied. Oh, almost forgot: It is likely no coincidence the stag Eikþyrnir gnaws at Yggdrasil while also standing watch over Valhǫll.

1.07k views · Dec 14th, 2020