The Black Creek Pioneer Village is a living tribute to the Toronto area’s pioneering roots.

thumb_up5thumb_downchat_bubble

More from Jorge_Saint_Just

Poignant Reminders: Many moments have meanings related to your togetherness: one weekend at the cottage, the family reunion... anytime when activities were shared can be poignant reminder of happy days gone by. All are special reminders of the absence of someone in your life.

118 views · Dec 23rd, 2020

Another Space-Time? - Pulsars Ticking and blinking like a cosmic metronome, pulsars keep far better time than the most accurate ordinary clock, and anyone can see the beam of this cosmic lighthouse flash once each rotation of any planet (astronomers wonder how the sky would look from the surface of a planet rotating around a pulsar). Long-term timing or the radio pulse rate of some pulsars suggests that these objects may have one or more small planetary companions. It is conceivable thus that a planet could survive the evolution of a star into a pulsar. Or a pulsar may have captured a planet at a later time. If you could somehow survive the gravitational tides and radiation flux trying to land on a pulsar, it is just possible that you might emerge in another part of space-time – somewhere else in space, somewhen else in time. Might gravity tunnels provide a kind of interstellar or intergalactic subway, permitting us to travel to inaccessible places much more rapidly than we could in the ordinary way? Can pulsars serve as time machines, carrying us to the remote past or the distant future? The fact that such ideas are being discussed even semi-seriously shows how surreal the universe may be. Such worm holes in space, a little like those in an apple, have been suggested by physicists and astronomers, although these phenomena have by no means been proved to exist. May be, it’s for better, because we must be the most backward technical society in the Galaxy. Any society still more backward would not have radio astronomy at all. If the doleful experiences of cultural conflict on Earth were the galactic standard, it seems we would already have been destroyed, perhaps with some passing admiration expressed for Shakespeare, Bach and Vermeer. But this has not happened. Perhaps alien intentions are uncompromisingly benign. Or might it be, despite all the pretensions about UFOs and ancient astronauts, that our civilization has not yet been discovered? On one hand, if even a small fraction of technical civilizations learn to live with themselves and with weapons of mass destruction, there should now be an enormous number of advanced civilizations in the Galaxy. We already have slow interstellar flight, and think fast interstellar flight a possible goal for the human species. On the other hand, there is no credible evidence for the Earth being visited, now or ever. Is this not a contradiction? Pulsars, what role do they play in this? Will we ever know the answer? Why are they not here, on Earth? May another space-time dimension play a role in this enigma? Image: © Megan Jorgensen.

116 views · Dec 22nd, 2020

Buying Your First Scope A telescope need not have high magnifying power or be expensive to allow you to see every planet in the solar system. It is the size of the lens aperture and the instrument’s portability that count. John Shibley, an editor at Astronomy magazine and author that publication’s annual telescope buyer’s guide, has these tips on equipping yourself to scan the heavens: Focus on a telescope’s lens size: A lot of people ask, “What power is that scope?” Actually, magnification is irrelevant. What matters is the amount of light a telescope gathers, which depends on the size of the mirror that brings light to a focus or the size of the lens itself. The bigger the mirror or the lens, the fainter the objects you will be able to see and the better the resolution. If you don’t have a large aperture, you crank up the magnification and it just ends up stretching an image that is not any good to begin with. Start with a reflecting scope: There are two types of telescopes: reflecting and refracting. A reflecting telescope costs about half as much as a comparable-sized refracting telescope – it is excellent for star and nebulae observations and for use in astrophotography. The refracting telescope tends to distort images less and is good for lunar and solar observation. It can distort color, though, and can be difficult to move, which may turn off beginners. Know your mounts: A scope in the $800-$1000 range has a Dobsonian mount, which means the scope can be pivoted up and down and left and right but can’t be calibrated to line up with the earth’s axis so that it automatically follows the stars. More expensive scopes come with equatorial mounts – they are the ones that actually track the sky. Get several eyepieces: Usually you want to get three eyepieces. That is because observing the moon requires a low magnification, planets a medium magnification, and the stars a high magnification. Any eyepiece with a focal length in the upper 20s to lower 30s in millimeters is considered low-powered; from the mid-teens to the lower 20s is medium-powered. Anything lower than 12 mm is high-powered. Having more than one eyepiece allows you to adjust to atmospheric changes that may make objects look blurry. See also: https://www.minds.com/newsfeed/1183611942522580992

48 views · Dec 22nd, 2020

More from Jorge_Saint_Just

Poignant Reminders: Many moments have meanings related to your togetherness: one weekend at the cottage, the family reunion... anytime when activities were shared can be poignant reminder of happy days gone by. All are special reminders of the absence of someone in your life.

118 views · Dec 23rd, 2020

Another Space-Time? - Pulsars Ticking and blinking like a cosmic metronome, pulsars keep far better time than the most accurate ordinary clock, and anyone can see the beam of this cosmic lighthouse flash once each rotation of any planet (astronomers wonder how the sky would look from the surface of a planet rotating around a pulsar). Long-term timing or the radio pulse rate of some pulsars suggests that these objects may have one or more small planetary companions. It is conceivable thus that a planet could survive the evolution of a star into a pulsar. Or a pulsar may have captured a planet at a later time. If you could somehow survive the gravitational tides and radiation flux trying to land on a pulsar, it is just possible that you might emerge in another part of space-time – somewhere else in space, somewhen else in time. Might gravity tunnels provide a kind of interstellar or intergalactic subway, permitting us to travel to inaccessible places much more rapidly than we could in the ordinary way? Can pulsars serve as time machines, carrying us to the remote past or the distant future? The fact that such ideas are being discussed even semi-seriously shows how surreal the universe may be. Such worm holes in space, a little like those in an apple, have been suggested by physicists and astronomers, although these phenomena have by no means been proved to exist. May be, it’s for better, because we must be the most backward technical society in the Galaxy. Any society still more backward would not have radio astronomy at all. If the doleful experiences of cultural conflict on Earth were the galactic standard, it seems we would already have been destroyed, perhaps with some passing admiration expressed for Shakespeare, Bach and Vermeer. But this has not happened. Perhaps alien intentions are uncompromisingly benign. Or might it be, despite all the pretensions about UFOs and ancient astronauts, that our civilization has not yet been discovered? On one hand, if even a small fraction of technical civilizations learn to live with themselves and with weapons of mass destruction, there should now be an enormous number of advanced civilizations in the Galaxy. We already have slow interstellar flight, and think fast interstellar flight a possible goal for the human species. On the other hand, there is no credible evidence for the Earth being visited, now or ever. Is this not a contradiction? Pulsars, what role do they play in this? Will we ever know the answer? Why are they not here, on Earth? May another space-time dimension play a role in this enigma? Image: © Megan Jorgensen.

116 views · Dec 22nd, 2020

Buying Your First Scope A telescope need not have high magnifying power or be expensive to allow you to see every planet in the solar system. It is the size of the lens aperture and the instrument’s portability that count. John Shibley, an editor at Astronomy magazine and author that publication’s annual telescope buyer’s guide, has these tips on equipping yourself to scan the heavens: Focus on a telescope’s lens size: A lot of people ask, “What power is that scope?” Actually, magnification is irrelevant. What matters is the amount of light a telescope gathers, which depends on the size of the mirror that brings light to a focus or the size of the lens itself. The bigger the mirror or the lens, the fainter the objects you will be able to see and the better the resolution. If you don’t have a large aperture, you crank up the magnification and it just ends up stretching an image that is not any good to begin with. Start with a reflecting scope: There are two types of telescopes: reflecting and refracting. A reflecting telescope costs about half as much as a comparable-sized refracting telescope – it is excellent for star and nebulae observations and for use in astrophotography. The refracting telescope tends to distort images less and is good for lunar and solar observation. It can distort color, though, and can be difficult to move, which may turn off beginners. Know your mounts: A scope in the $800-$1000 range has a Dobsonian mount, which means the scope can be pivoted up and down and left and right but can’t be calibrated to line up with the earth’s axis so that it automatically follows the stars. More expensive scopes come with equatorial mounts – they are the ones that actually track the sky. Get several eyepieces: Usually you want to get three eyepieces. That is because observing the moon requires a low magnification, planets a medium magnification, and the stars a high magnification. Any eyepiece with a focal length in the upper 20s to lower 30s in millimeters is considered low-powered; from the mid-teens to the lower 20s is medium-powered. Anything lower than 12 mm is high-powered. Having more than one eyepiece allows you to adjust to atmospheric changes that may make objects look blurry. See also: https://www.minds.com/newsfeed/1183611942522580992

48 views · Dec 22nd, 2020