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Throughout history, prosecutors have sought to "amass glory" by prosecuting prominent people

Barr issues blistering critique of his own Justice Department Attorney General William Barr delivered a scathing critique of his own Justice Department on Wednesday night, insisting on his absolute authority to overrule career staff, whom he said too often injected themselves into politics and went "headhunting" for high profile targets. The attorney general, the nation's top law enforcement official, spent much of the speech eviscerating the idea of the Justice Department as a place where nonpolitical career prosecutors should be left to decide how sensitive cases are resolved. Barr said, throughout history, prosecutors have sought to "amass glory" by prosecuting prominent people, and he regularly witnessed that phenomenon during his supervision of the Justice Department. "I'd like to be able to say that we don't see head hunting in the Department of Justice," Barr said. "That would not be truthful. I see it every day." Speaking at an event hosted by Hillsdale College, a school with deep ties to conservative politics, Barr directly addressed the criticism that has been building for months inside the department toward his heavy hand in politically sensitive cases, particularly those involving associates of President Donald Trump. "What exactly am I interfering with?" he asked. "Under the law, all prosecutorial power is invested in the attorney general." Barr's comments were remarkable, in that the head of the Justice Department catalogued all of the ways in which he thought his agency had gone astray over the years, and in its current formulation harms the body politic. Barr has drawn considerable criticism for intervening in criminal cases in ways that help benefit the president's friends. Barr said it was he, not career officials, who have the ultimate authority to decide how cases should be handled, and derided less-experienced, less-senior bureaucrats who current and former prosecutors have long insisted should be left to handle their cases free from interference from political appointees. Barr said that argument, in essence, means "the will of the most junior member of the organization" would make decisions, but he insisted he would not "blindly" defer to "whatever those subordinates want to do." "Letting the most junior members set the agenda might be a good philosophy for a Montessori preschool, but it is no way to run a federal agency," Barr said. The attorney general, the nation's top law enforcement official, spent much of the speech eviscerating the idea of the Justice Department as a place where nonpolitical career prosecutors should be left to decide how sensitive cases are resolved. Barr said, throughout history, prosecutors have sought to "amass glory" by prosecuting prominent people, and he regularly witnessed that phenomenon during his supervision of the Justice Department. "I'd like to be able to say that we don't see head hunting in the Department of Justice," Barr said. "That would not be truthful. I see it every day." https://www.minds.com/newsfeed/1153670378272800768

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