More from Aeternis

An excellent video from an excellent channel. Whether you are interested in my take below or not, I highly recommend The History Guy. Since I'm sharing it, you can bet I'm going to tie something back to writing fiction, and I am. What does a little airplane have to teach us about writing fiction? Firstly, keep in mind that it's not the big iron and megamachines (or planet cracking magic) that makes a combat scene intense. The tales of the heroic madmen who flew Piper Cubs in combat are gripping precisely because the characters have such woefully insufficient equipment for the thing they set out to accomplish, and yet they succeeded. Underdogs, not all powerful warriors, garner audience sympathy. Secondly, notice the big impact a small player focusing on the task set to them can have. Your characters don't need to be the metaphorical battleships of their world, and readers will find it easier to sympathize with a "little guy in a big pond" than a heavyweight in a rarefied environment of heavyweights. Their efforts can still be a key part of world-shaping events, as long as the conflict of the story is set up properly. Thirdly and finally, the victories earned by your characters should be appropriate and proportional to their abilities for optimum payoff. The Piper Cub pilot being credited for a single Tiger tank kill in his little spotter plane is impressive because he is given so little to work with, whereas the same kill awarded to a P-47 fighter-bomber would be just another notch on the scoreboard. Similarly, we would be incredulous if the Piper were credited with anything larger (such as sinking a battleship), unless the event was explained in detail. Tailor the success of your characters to their situation and abilities; the less they have to work with, the less it takes to be a stunning success. https://youtu.be/gl1oSed4n_0 #writing #writingadvice #fiction #history #video
585 views ·

I attended Gen Con Indianapolis this weekend, and as usual I signed up for a few writing seminars. Writing seminars at that convention - notably those put on by Michael Stackpole - are a major reason I write and am able to finish stories, short and full length. Unlike most years, I only went to the first one I signed up for. The $6 one-hour session billed as a guide to writing horror contained exactly zero actionable ideas about writing horror, and more time was devoted to virtue-signal interludes than implementation. What material was presented remained at an incredibly basic level, defining terms and so on. As my second seminar was put on by the same presenter, I didn't bother. To be clear, I am an unpublished, untrained amateur, and I left thinking that the material was too entry level and contained nothing I could apply in my own writing craft. I'll be writing a blog post detailing the seminar (good and bad aspects) later this week. Maybe this is a consequence of being "spoiled" by the hard-to-follow Stackpole events, but I don't think that's all there is to it. Why is so much writing "help" so incredibly empty? If you have a favorite source of practical writing advice and support, let me know. If you write Minds posts about the craft of writing and I don't already follow you, let me know as well. I'm always looking for good content on this subject to amplify. #writingadvice #writing #fiction #minds #blog

71 views ·

More from Aeternis

An excellent video from an excellent channel. Whether you are interested in my take below or not, I highly recommend The History Guy. Since I'm sharing it, you can bet I'm going to tie something back to writing fiction, and I am. What does a little airplane have to teach us about writing fiction? Firstly, keep in mind that it's not the big iron and megamachines (or planet cracking magic) that makes a combat scene intense. The tales of the heroic madmen who flew Piper Cubs in combat are gripping precisely because the characters have such woefully insufficient equipment for the thing they set out to accomplish, and yet they succeeded. Underdogs, not all powerful warriors, garner audience sympathy. Secondly, notice the big impact a small player focusing on the task set to them can have. Your characters don't need to be the metaphorical battleships of their world, and readers will find it easier to sympathize with a "little guy in a big pond" than a heavyweight in a rarefied environment of heavyweights. Their efforts can still be a key part of world-shaping events, as long as the conflict of the story is set up properly. Thirdly and finally, the victories earned by your characters should be appropriate and proportional to their abilities for optimum payoff. The Piper Cub pilot being credited for a single Tiger tank kill in his little spotter plane is impressive because he is given so little to work with, whereas the same kill awarded to a P-47 fighter-bomber would be just another notch on the scoreboard. Similarly, we would be incredulous if the Piper were credited with anything larger (such as sinking a battleship), unless the event was explained in detail. Tailor the success of your characters to their situation and abilities; the less they have to work with, the less it takes to be a stunning success. https://youtu.be/gl1oSed4n_0 #writing #writingadvice #fiction #history #video
585 views ·

I attended Gen Con Indianapolis this weekend, and as usual I signed up for a few writing seminars. Writing seminars at that convention - notably those put on by Michael Stackpole - are a major reason I write and am able to finish stories, short and full length. Unlike most years, I only went to the first one I signed up for. The $6 one-hour session billed as a guide to writing horror contained exactly zero actionable ideas about writing horror, and more time was devoted to virtue-signal interludes than implementation. What material was presented remained at an incredibly basic level, defining terms and so on. As my second seminar was put on by the same presenter, I didn't bother. To be clear, I am an unpublished, untrained amateur, and I left thinking that the material was too entry level and contained nothing I could apply in my own writing craft. I'll be writing a blog post detailing the seminar (good and bad aspects) later this week. Maybe this is a consequence of being "spoiled" by the hard-to-follow Stackpole events, but I don't think that's all there is to it. Why is so much writing "help" so incredibly empty? If you have a favorite source of practical writing advice and support, let me know. If you write Minds posts about the craft of writing and I don't already follow you, let me know as well. I'm always looking for good content on this subject to amplify. #writingadvice #writing #fiction #minds #blog

71 views ·